Diana Krall and the Utah Symphony

It’s no secret: I geek out at Deer Valley summer concerts. It doesn’t matter if it’s a new discovery, or an old favorite. If I’m outdoors, with people I adore, watching live music and enjoying a picnic basket prepared by the expert culinary team at Deer Valley, then I am a happy camper of the highest order. Couple that with bumping into dear friends our neighbor, Sue, our pal Nikole and making some new acquaintances (I’m looking at you, fun couple from Texas), and I’m good to go. However, if you give me a few extra hours in gorgeous weather, hanging out with my husband and listening to Diana Krall with the Utah Symphony? Well, I am pretty sure there is no better way to spend the evening.


Because Krall happens to be one of Jeffrey’s and my favorite artists, we wanted to arrive early to get good seats. Pro tip: You can buy “back-rest” style seats which sit flat on the ground, and still qualify for seating in the “blankets-only” section, which fills up more slowly than the “chairs” section. So even though we were not anywhere close to the front of the line-up at the gates before they opened, we scored a close-enough spot that we could hear and see well.

When I saw Krall perform years ago at Abravanel Hall, I felt like that experience ruined me for all others no way would another one of her concerts be as perfect. Well, simply put, I’m an idiot. This woman has proven for years that she will capitalize on any opportunity to top herself. The evening she played at Deer Valley was ample demonstration of this. The weather, too, seemed to rise to the occasion. Sure, it was hotter than usual that night, but it was also clear, gorgeous and, eventually, the kind of cool summer evening that reminds us of why we live in the mountains.


Krall, herself, remarked upon this several times, noting that Deer Valley is her favorite ski destination, that she always feels at home here. (This is a recurring theme for nearly every artist who visits the Snow Park Amphitheater stage whether for the first time or on a return visit. And, no, I don’t think it’s just stage-patter flattery.)

One of the reasons Krall is such a joy to watch is that she, herself, is a fan. More than once, in the course of her set, she simply stopped playing to watch her band members, or to take in the Symphony’s arrangement, under the direction of conductor Jerry Steichen. “I kind of get lost in the music and forget to play,” she admitted. “I’m just such a fan.” It’s an occupational hazard, likely, of surrounding yourself with other gifted musicians.

So, thanks, Diana Krall, for giving me even more reasons to love your music, and to geek out at my favorite venue. Hurry back, please.

2015 Kimball Arts Festival

Every local I know has a favorite way to enjoy the Kimball Arts Festival. Artists, like my pal Jenny Terry, thrill at the prospect of being invited to participate. Others have repeat gigs as festival volunteers, selling tickets at gates, staffing the kids’ activities, helping out the artists, and doing countless little tasks that most festival attendees never realize have to happen. And, of course, tons of locals turn out on the Friday night of the festival, when locals are offered free admission.

Photo courtesy of Kimball Art Center/Mark Maziarz.

Photo courtesy of Kimball Art Center/Mark Maziarz.

This year, as my family and I toured the festival, I realized that we, too, have our own Festival tradition the “Sunday morning stroll.”

We tend to arrive soon after the gates open on the final day of the festival. The sun isn’t quite high enough to beat down on the pavement, so it’s comfortable to walk around. We’ve likely enjoyed a late breakfast, so the kids aren’t clamoring for lunch the minute we arrive. And the crowd hasn’t hit its nadir yet, so we have the ability to chat with a few of the artists.

Main St_2 (1)

Photo courtesy of Kimball Art Center/Mark Maziarz.

Also, we never know who we’ll run into. This year I had some marching orders. A friend in Boulder, CO had sent me a message that she wanted me to stop by the booth of an artist friend whose work she has photographed. We stopped to say hello to Dolan Geiman and got lost in his booth for a while, admiring his unique brand of “upcycled” art: objects layered and textured with a variety of media, and creating the kind of art that engages you in different ways every time you look at it.

Later as we made our way through some fascinating photography booths, we ran into our neighbor, Christopher, and his cousin. “I’m looking around to see what other wood workers are up to,” he explained. A talented carpenter, Chris is always eager to explore new ideas and inspirations.


Photo courtesy of Kimball Art Center/Mark Maziarz.

Of course, we stopped to see Jenny, who was thrilled by the response she received from her work this year. “I am so happy to see friendly faces,” she said. “I love meeting new people, but seeing my friends at the booth is a treat.”

Finally, we ran into our friend, photographer Mark Maziarz, who, it could be argued, had the most fun job at the Kimball Arts Festival: he was on duty capturing the presentation of awards to the winners.


Photo courtesy of Kimball Art Center/Mark Maziarz.

How do you enjoy the Kimball Arts Festival? Is there a method to your walk-and-hunt, or does each year give you the chance to do things a little differently than the year before? Let me know in the comments!

#DeerValleySummer Mountain Bike Tip Series – Week 11

Raise and Lower Your Saddle

Just like your body, your saddle should not remain static throughout your ride. To get the most out of your bike you’ll want to lower your seat during your descents. This will allow for all of the bike movement to happen that we’ve been talking about throughout these posts. If your seat is too high during a descent, you’re blocked from being active, from being low, from moving the bike laterally and from being loose. When climbing your seat should be high enough for an efficient pedal stroke. This also protects your knees, knee pain can result from climbing with too low of a saddle.
LB2015.09.15.seatlowcroppedLB2015.09.15.seathighcroppedSee all of the play in height you have to work with? Don’t forget that your entire bike is meant to be dynamic.

Constantly changing your seat height may not seem ideal. However, with new dropper post technology, adjusting seat height is as easy as pushing a button. Curious about how this might change your ride? Come try the SCOTT Genius LT at one of our rental shops.

LB2015.09.15.seatlowridercroppedDoug demonstrates the concept of having room for your saddle to move under you. His seat is not interfering with where his bike needs to go.

This weekend, September 19 & 20, are the last days of lift served mountain biking at Deer Valley for the season. Come practice what we’ve been preaching. And if you haven’t ridden Tidal Wave (our new blue flow-style trail) yet, it’s now 100% open. Even this new-to-mountain-biking-biker knows it’s the most fun you’ll have all summer. Share your post-ride joy in the comments below or with #DeerValleySummer on Facebook and Instagram.


We hope you’ve enjoyed this weekly summer series. Sadly this is the last one as our gears shift into winter. Stay tuned for weekly ski tips, coming soon to this blog!

We hope you enjoy our weekly mountain bike tips. Please remember that they can help but will not eliminate risks, as mountain biking is a dynamic sport. These tips are meant to help you build skills and progress for a more enjoyable mountain biking experience.

Race you to the top

This summer any time I was invited on a hike, it was a production. Knee brace? Check. Hiking poles? Check. I can remain in denial about advancing into middle age for only so long, right? Whatever.

Most days the hassle was worth the killer views, exhilarating endorphin’s, the works. Then, rather by accident, I happened into a pleasurable mountain climbing experience, the likes of which I had not enjoyed in several years: The scenic chairlift ride.

07092015 Tidal Wave 109

My in-laws were visiting, and the kids wanted to show them the top of Bald Mountain, which is one of their favorite spots to ski. We were tempted by a text from our friends Stacey and Steven, who were planning to hike the Silver Lake Trail (one of my favorites we used to do it a lot when the boys were still riding in frame packs). We hadn’t seen them since winter, and they had just landed to spend the holiday weekend in their home. So the temptation to say, “yes,” was great. However, between my uncooperative knee and the in-laws’ recent arrival from their sea-level home turf, it seemed like a better idea to ride the lift up, and meet up with our friends afterward.

We split up into threesomes for the ride up on the quad chairlift. Dad, Grandma and Lance in one chair, Seth and Papa and me in the other.

It turns out, not every ascent has to be adrenaline-filled to be thrilling. The views, alone, were enough to stop me in my tracks. Even better were the moments when my kids pointed out their favorite ski runs to their grandparents. “See where those guys are mountain biking?” Seth asked. “That’s one of my favorite places to ski.” His grandfather was duly impressed with the kid’s ability to navigate the trees.

07092015 Tidal Wave 121

We chatted, excitedly, about some favorite moments we had enjoyed on the mountain over the course of the ski season. We pointed out Sunset Cabin, where Seth helped me lead Temple Har Shalom’s famed “Ski Shul,” a ski-in ski-out Shabbat service, held each Friday at 3 p.m. during ski season.

Soon, we were disembarking from the chair (something that seems to inspire us to break into a jog, actually) and scrambling up the steps to the view area. While we pointed out ski trails and views of town to our visiting family, we took a bunch of photos. Then, out of the corner of my eye, I spotted Stacey and Steven, just summiting their hike.

07092015 Tidal Wave 008

“Perfect timing!” I announced. “We couldn’t have planned that!”

We spent a few minutes more, exploring the mountain, and then added Stacey to one chair, Steven to the other, and began our descent. There is a good argument to be made for a round-trip chairlift ride, because the views of the Jordanelle (which you only glimpse for a few moments on the ride up) are expansive, spectacular, and in sight for a good several minutes on the way down.

07092015 Tidal Wave 111

Of course, after all of that hard work, we needed refreshment. Thankfully, Steven and Stacey had the exact right trick up their sleeve a stop at the Snack Shack at Silver Lake Lodge to pick up Deer Valley’s famous chocolate chip cookie ice cream sandwiches.

Snack Shack summer opening on June 19, 2015

Summer Shopping at Deer Valley

Summer sales are my jam. That’s when I pick up technical base layers at bargain prices, reduced-price ski pants off of the kids’ racks (for my kids and their vertically challenged mom), and lots of other winter gear basics that always seem to be in short supply in our house once the snow flies. So imagine my delight when I was strolling past the Deer Valley Signatures store at Silver Lake Village one day this summer and found a sweater. Not just any sweater, mind you, but one I’ll call The Sweater of Joy.


See, in the last few months, I’ve been reading “The Magical Art of Tidying Up,” by Marie Kondo, and I made a commitment to only acquiring (and keeping) items for myself that bring me JOY. This sweater passed the test on so many levels. First, it was available only in my size. Not too big, not too small. My size. Second, it was displayed on a rack outside the door, marked “SALE.” Bargain! Yay! The original price had been scratched out, a price about 50 percent lower had been penciled in. Third, and perhaps most importantly, it elicited a bunch of groans from my kids. “You’re buying that, Mom?” they aren’t always on board with my predilection for polka dots or for mixing bright hues in a single garment. It embarrasses them. SOLD.

I was so convinced that owning this sweater would bring me joy that I didn’t even try it on. (My mother-in-law, visiting us for the weekend, was shocked that I would purchase any item of clothing without trying it on. But hey, sometimes you’ve got to live on the edge, right?) I knew it would be the perfect piece to layer year-round bright enough to show flair at a summer concert, after sunset, or to lend a pop of color to a snowy day.

Truth be told, there was a rack full of awesome bargains. Leather jackets, marked down to well-below mid-winter prices, more sweaters, some pants. But the thing is, I knew not one of these other garments, no matter how lovely, would match this sweater in the JOY department. So off I went to the register, wherein I was greeted with yet another surprise, the sweater’s revised price tag did not reflect an additional discount being offered that day. I’m calling it a win.

You can grab the last of the summer sale items this weekend (September 19 and 20, 2015) at the Signatures store at Silver Lake Lodge before it closes for the season. Or stop by the Signatures Store on Park City’s Historic Main Street this fall. Let me know if you find any hot deals.

7 Steps To Happiness With Lee Brice at Deer Valley Resort

FullSizeRender (20)

Lee Brice is not a philosopher. I know that. He is a singer songwriter who just won the 2015 AMC, Best Single award for his song, “I Don’t Dance”, and he just performed at Deer Valley as park of the St. Regis Big Stars, Bright Nights concert series.

Maybe he is an accidental philosopher because during his concert, he certainly shared some keys to leading a fulfilling life with the crowd. He didn’t read them off in a list, of course, but the audience picked them up none-the-less. I’ll share a few that I gleaned from the evening.

Here are 7 steps to happiness from Lee Brice:

Celebrate life (with a pre-party, a party and an after party)

I’ve been to a lot of concerts at the Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater at Deer Valley Resort in the 11 years I’ve been coming to Park City in the summers, but I’ve never seen so many people tailgating before a concert.

Actually, I don’t think I had ever seen anyone tailgating before.  

There were quite a few parties going on with music playing from truck speakers and friends socializing as I parked and walked up to the venue.

Enjoy the simple things

Sunshine on my face and moonshine on my lips.”  This line just makes me want to stop what I am doing, go outside and soak up some sun. I’m not so sure about moonshine on my lips personally because I have heard it’s pretty high in alcohol content. To each his own,  but maybe for me and my girlfriends, we’d replace that particular beverage with a pinot noir.  

The concept, however, rings true, “stop, sip, relax and enjoy your life.”

Savor what you really enjoy

Beer! There is no doubt in my mind that Lee Brice and the Little Canyon Band enjoy a beer from time to time. How can you tell?

IMG_0503 (1)

Share with others

This might look like speaker but think again. This is really a mini fridge filled with cold beer. Lee grabbed one for himself and another one to share with a thirsty fan in the front row.


There are highs and lows in life, don’t ignore the lows.

His hit song, “I Drive Your Truck” really hits home when we think of a loved one. How do we grieve when we miss someone close to us that has passed away? This song was inspired by a man whose son was a soldier who died in Afghanistan. 

Lee sang, “People have their way of coping and I’ve got mine. I drive your truck. I roll every window down and I burn it up.” What I took from those lyrics was, if you are going to miss someone, dig deep and let yourself really miss them.  

When I miss my Mom who passed away over 5 years ago, I love to wear her wedding ring. Slipping her ring on my finger, makes me feel like I am holding her hand somehow. When you think about it, if you are grieving, that means you really cared for someone. Caring is a good thing.

Honor those who serve.

Lee gave a shout out to our military (during the above song) and asked us to flick a lighter to honor those who served in the armed forces. Everyone quickly clicked on their zippo lighter apps or flashlights on their phones. Lee embraced an emotional veteran who’d approached the stage in a genuine show of appreciation for his service.


You get more back more than you give

Lee had met an enthusiastic young man at a meet-and-greet earlier that night and during the concert, he signed a guitar and gave it to him.  You can see the happiness on this kid’s face to the delight of everyone in the audience.


Ralph Waldo Emerson once said, “What you do speaks so loudly, I can’t hear what you say.

In the case of the Lee Brice concert, we all could certainly hear what he had to say, or rather, sing. The music was great, Deer Valley’s food was amazing, and the venue was stunning as always. There were also a few good messages that came loud and clear, too.

IMG_0524 IMG_0493

A pre-party, a party, an after-party and a few life lessons to boot, I think Lee Brice might just be a philosopher in disguise.

Women on Wednesday: Perfect Partnerships

Some of my favorite combinations in life can be described as perfect partnerships: peanut Butter and Jelly. My boys, when they’re getting along well. In skiing, there are a couple of “perfect partnerships” every skier should cultivate. One is an instructor who “gets” you and whose style suits yours. The other is a good shop that can guide you through the care and feeding of you ski gear quiver rather than just sell you what you think you want, or tell you what you think you want to hear.

Eric Schramm Photography 2015

The 2014 – 2015 season was my second year skiing Women on Wednesday, and when my two favorite “perfect partnerships” came together at the program’s welcome reception, I knew I was in for a treat. Jans Mountain Outfitters hosts the reception in their Snow Park Lodge store. Instructors and students mingle, meet and clinic veterans reconnect. I was happy to see Terri and Darlene, two members of the group I skied with the first year. And then, Donna—wonderful Donna McAleer. “The band is back together!” we shrieked (really, we did). I told them, excitedly, that our friend Kellie would be there in the morning, too. As far as I’m concerned, skiing with Donna is proof that perfect partnerships exist, especially when I think about the time we lucked into a ski day together, a couple of years ago.

We toasted our good fortune and then turned our attention to the excellent gear-head pep-talk from the Yoda of Jans Mountain Outfitters, Scott. (If, you know, Yoda were not short, green and hairy, but rather tall, gentle and genial.) “Please take advantage of the demo day we offer you,” he urged. “Finding the right pair of skis when you’re getting this level of instruction, can improve your skiing dramatically.” He also underscored the importance of a well-fitted boot.

He urged us to take advantage of the excellent tuning department. “Yes, I enjoy some privileges, but I will tell you that I never go out on the mountain without freshly-waxed skis,” he explained. “It makes the equipment work for you.” At that moment, I made a mental note to bring my skis in for a wax at the end of the following day. I’d logged more runs than I realized and the bottoms of my skis were, in fact, begging for some attention.

On day one there was a welcome breakfast, during which the catch-up continued, and students and instructors discussed goals for the five-week session. “We’re all here to have fun,” said Kelly, who supervises the Women on Wednesdays program. “So speak up if you’re not, so we know how to make it better.”

At the buffet, I bumped into a woman who had skied program the year before as well. “Wait a minute, I remember you,” she said. “Aren’t you an amazing skier?”

“Well, if you put it that way, of course I am!” I joked with her. “You’re my favorite, don’t tell the others!”

With my ego pumped, my pals Kellie, Terri and Darlene by my side, and the prospect of a sunny day on the slopes, I was ready to take on the day. A fun morning of get-to-know-you lift rides, including a warm up run on Success ski run, and a ski-off on Big Stick ski run, and we were split into our groups. We urged another woman to come join us with Donna. “We need a drummer!” someone said. “Come be our Ringo!”

Four instructors—two Advanced and two Expert—led us to the top of the double blue section of Big Stick, and we were told each group’s goals. Expert groups would spend the majority of their time, conditions permitting, off-piste, and likely in the Daly Chutes. “We’ll work on fundamentals on the groomers, double blues and blacks. So we can build confidence in every kind of conditions and terrain,” Donna said to the Advanced groups. “My group will go off piste, into moguls and probably the Chutes.” My heart skipped a beat, but I reminded myself this was a longer term goal, that Donna would build our group into a team that would be ready for the challenge by the time it presented itself. “Let’s go!” She said, as she prepared to make her first turn down Big Stick. “The Band is back together!”

All morning, Donna led us down double blue ski runs, Tycoon and Jordanelle were my two favorites. I love her “Ski it twice” mantra. If you like the conditions, ski it again. If you don’t like them? Ski it again because now you know how to adjust for the terrain.

Jordanelle Sign

By lunchtime, we were ready for a break—and lots of water, since we’d spent most of the day in the sunshine. The first day of Women on Wednesdays, we eat in Silver Lake Lodge, taking our trays to the Mariposa dining room, so that the instructors and students can compare notes on the morning. Instructors compare notes on the skiers they’re coaching, to make sure that everyone is placed in groups from which they will learn the most. And, as I learned, the resort uses this moment to make sure the groups are split into the promised 4 – 6 students-per-instructor ratio. “I’ve really enjoyed the morning skiing with you, but I want you to listen to what Kelly, who supervises this program, has to say,” she explained.

Kelly noted that if we wanted to remain as a group of seven, then we’d need to sign a paper that acknowledged that we were not getting the ratio we’d paid for. “Deer Valley wants to honor its promise to you,” Kelly said. “And we want to ensure a great experience.”

“I don’t care what I have to sign, I’m staying with you!” I announced to Donna—and the whole table. Everyone laughed, but I was dead serious. Still, It broke the ice enough for others to speak up. One of our group asked if she could move down to an Intermediate group from our Advanced crew. Another was encouraged—by the instructors and by the rest of us, to try out the Expert group for the afternoon. With that, we had achieved wiggle room, so that if one of the two changed her mind, there would be room to welcome her back.


With that settled, our newly-minted group of five headed for Stein’s Way—where conditions were not quite as stellar or consistent as promised, and for some reason, I lost all my mojo by the third turn. I clamped my boots down to the point of distortion and pain, and fought my way down the hill. The inevitable had happened—my boots were giving me every indication they’d seen better days. I made a note to stop into Jans to get my skis waxed—and to lay the groundwork for a boot fitting later in the week. I ended the day feeling grateful for perfect partnerships—and for the fact that four more weeks of fun lay ahead.

#DeerValleySummer Mountain Bike Tip Series – Week 10

Save a Climb, Ride a Chairlift (and grab a coach)

A great way to practice and improve your biking skills is to ride the chairlift up the mountain. While some may scoff at the idea of not “working for it,” riding up the lift once or twice a season is a great way to hit the trail system fresh and ready for practicing some of the tools we’ve discussed in this blog series. And just because you’ve had a hand going up doesn’t mean you won’t be pedaling – there’s hours of riding to be done here at Deer Valley with just one chairlift ride. The best part is, you won’t be too tired or in “survival mode” from an hour (or more) climb to work on your technique, and you’ll have the mental and physical ability to focus on riding successfully.

Want to really improve? Try out our mountain bike school. We’re staffed with knowledgeable and passionate riders who want to make sure you’re getting the most out of your bike and your day.

IMG_0544 IMG_0606 IMG_0730We hope you enjoy our weekly mountain bike tips. Please remember that they can help but will not eliminate risks, as mountain biking is a dynamic sport. These tips are meant to help you build skills and progress for a more enjoyable mountain biking experience.

Previewing the Mid-Mountain Marathon

The annual Mid-Mountain Marathon is coming up this Saturday, September 12. I am a casual road runner. I normally don’t run on trails and have never participated in a race over 17 miles. This said, I was curious to know more about the event that ushers in fall in Park City, Utah. I sat down with Executive Director of the Mountain Trails Foundation, Charlie Sturgis, who filled me in on all the details of this long distance mountain race at 8,000 feet.


JF: How many years has the Mid-Mountain Marathon been going on?

Charlie Sturgis: We’re getting close to about two decades.

JF: How many competitors does the event able attract?

Charlie Sturgis: We have between 350 and 360 participants. We try to cap it around 400. The reason why we limit the number of competitors is because passing on a single track can be a challenge. If we had over 400 racers the race would become too congested.

JF: Considering this, how is the start organized to give the fastest competitors a chance?

Charlie Sturgis: The start of the race is on the pavement, at the Silver Lake area of Deer Valley, which gives those who really need to be upfront a chance to get there from the get-go. All gets sorted out at the start.


JF: What level of competitors do you attract?

Charlie Sturgis: It is actually quite impressive. The men’s best times are generally just over 3 hours, something between 3:10 and 3:15 while the women’s finish right around 3:30 to 3:40. Because of the caliber of the field, the “rabbit” leading the race has to be a top notch rider.

JF: The “rabbit?”

Charlie Sturgis: Yes, we have someone on a mountain bike showing the way so the leading racers don’t have to worry about where the trail goes. You need a top-notch rider capable of staying clear of the first runner, a job not always easy to accomplish, especially in the uphill sections where the marathoners can catch up to that individual. All of the “rabbits” we have are always stunned by how fast the runners are.

JF: Where’s the finish line?

Charlie Sturgis: From 8,100 feet at Silver Lake, the course traverses Deer Valley Resort to Park City Village peaking out at 8,400 feet before descending to Canyons Village at 6,800 feet. This year’s finish will be off of the new Ambush-Holly trail at the Forum where the outdoor concerts take place, all of this adds up to the 26.2 miles course.


JF: Are competitors coming from all over or are they mostly locals?

Charlie Sturgis: Most of them are from Utah but we get a few from other places as well. Salomon is a sponsor for this race, so we encourage them to bring some of their racers. In years past, La Sportiva showed up with their racers. Even though this race is not on any special kind of circuit, competitors find it to be one of the most aesthetically pleasing to run.

JF: How difficult do competitors find this marathon compared to other venues?

Charlie Sturgis: Most first time competitors generally underrate the difficulty of the event. The Mid-Mountain trail was originally called the “8,000-foot trail” because it was built at around the 8,000 feet. The elevation variances of 400 feet often lead people to believe that it was not very hard. There are some significant ups and downs, including a 3,800 feet elevation gain. The terrain is very rugged in certain areas and athletes must be super mindful about where they land their feet.


JF: What advice would you give to first time participants?

Charlie Sturgis: For all of those lifestyle runners who want to get that competition off of their bucket list, the best advice is to take it easy. It’s okay to walk some sections, like the Iron Mountain area where the footing gets difficult. Catch a 20 minute break to make sure they have enough fuel left to complete the race.

JF: How many volunteers does the event have.

Charlie Sturgis: About 50 to 70 of them. If some of your readers are interested to help out, they can contact us through our website. We also try to seek out the help of the many nonprofits in town.

JF: What do the volunteers do?

Charlie Sturgis: Fifty of them staff the aid stations. We have at least 7 stations with 4 people at each. The race lasts most of the day. The course is actually closed for almost 8 hours to other users.

JF: Are emergency medical technicians on the course?

Charlie Sturgis: Yes, we have EMT’s throughout the course. The Park City Fire Department is represented too and we have Herb Lepley, a nurse practitioner from the Park City Clinic, on hand.

JF: What makes a high altitude trail marathon so unique?

Charlie Sturgis: I think it is the blend between its environment, its scenery and its simplicity. Not dealing with traffic and going from point-to-point makes it very special.

JF: Do you have any suggestions for the spectators?

Charlie Sturgis: The best areas to see the race are the start and the finish line. At either one of these spots you’ll generally find friends, family and spectators in large numbers. Anywhere in the middle of the course is very hard to find good viewing areas. So the start and finish areas are the places to be. Everyone is more than welcome to come and cheer on the participants.


See you on Saturday!

Another Great Tour of Utah

Even though I’m not a road cyclist, I love to watch a good road bike race. I always make a point of watching as much of the Tour de France as I can. Being from there and all.

dv-tou (1)

Park City hosts stages of a similar race, the annual Tour of Utah. I make certain that I don’t miss this race when it comes to town. Especially on the day when the race starts and ends on Park City’s Historic Main Street.

15 ToU Stage 7 Map 07-14-2015

Just like the Tour de France ends up parading the Parisian Champs-Élysées before coming to a close, the Tour of Utah does the same in Park City.


My wife and I went very early in the afternoon on Sunday, August 9, to visit the various vendors that were on the upper section of Main Street and to secure a good vantage point. We marveled at the Scott Sports tent where some bikes were lighter than air.


Upper Main Street was filled with vendors. We picked up some swag and admired artists writing encouraging slogans, designing all kind of symbols and painting American flags on the asphalt welcoming the competitors.


I’m not good at keeping tabs on who wins each stage and don’t know much about the teams engaged in the competition. This gives me more of a reason to cheer for each of the racers as they pass by the intersection of Heber Avenue and lower Main Street, just yards from the finish line!


These athletes seemed fueled by endless momentum gathered from reaching the top of the last peak (Empire Pass) and barreling down the rest of the course at 75 mph.


Large TV screens kept the spectators in touch with the race. The crowds began roaring a full minute before every single cyclist would make his entry onto Main Street after completing what is said to be the most grueling American cycling stage race.

dv-tou-gThe weather held steady, with some welcome big clouds making the temperature perfect. We promised that we would return next year, as the Tour of Utah will be back on Main Street, Park City, next August 7, 2016. Make sure to mark your calendar!