Deer Valley Resort Appoints New Food and Beverage Director

 

Jodie Rogers

                                               Jodie Rogers

Deer Valley Resort announced the promotion of Jodie Rogers to director of food and beverage. Julie Wilson, Deer Valley’s former director of food and beverage for over 30 years, will be retiring from the director position and transitioning to consulting for special food and beverage projects for Deer Valley Resorts, including Solitude Mountain Resort.

Julie Wilson

                                                Julie Wilson

Most recently, Rogers served as the executive chef of Snow Park and Empire Canyon Lodges, where she handled operations for all Snow Park and Empire Canyon Lodges restaurants and food events, including breakfast and lunch in the Snow Park Restaurant and Empire Canyon Grill; cuisine for the child care and ski school programs; après-ski appetizers in the EBS Lounge, Seafood Buffet, Fireside Dining, Deer Valley Grocery~Café and The Brass Tag, as well as, all summers banquets and weddings at the resort.

“Deer Valley is known for its award-winning food and beverage operations and Jodie has been vital to this success,” said Bob Wheaton, president and general manager for Deer Valley Resort. “She is a talented chef and her contributions to Deer Valley over the years have been substantial. We are so lucky to have her continue in this new role.”

As the Director Food and Beverage, Rogers will oversee all operations and offerings at the resort’s 12 restaurants, bakery and banquet operations.

Rogers, a native of Australia, spent her first five winters at Deer Valley as the manager of the employee dining program as well as an assistant sous chef and then sous chef at Snow Park Lodge. She was promoted to Snow Park Executive Chef in December 2000, Empire Canyon Lodge was added to her responsibilities in 2002, Deer Valley Grocery~Café in 2010 and The Brass Tag at the Lodges at Deer Valley in 2014. Rogers boasts a 20-year cooking career that includes several hotels in Sydney, Australia and working as head chef at Australia’s Charlotte Pass Resort. In both 1994 and 1998 she was part of the cooking teams that took the Australian Salon Culinare, Restaurant of Champions gold medal. She successfully opened Toast Bar and Restaurant in London, England in 1999. Rogers was invited to cook on NBC’s Today Show in March of 2014.

In addition to her many roles at Deer Valley, Rogers is the co-president of the Park City Area Restaurant Association, vice chairperson for the Summit Community Gardens and volunteers for the EATS program at Park City area schools.

Rogers currently resides in Park City with her husband Michael, son Graham and daughter Remy and enjoys skiing, snowshoeing, mountain biking, running half marathons, hiking, traveling, rock climbing, and cooking with her kids. For more information visit DeerValley.com

Lessons for a Memorable Mother Daughter Ski Day

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

Getting away from the daily grind and escaping to the silence and solitude of snow capped mountains is something this mom dreams of. Where piles of laundry are replaced by a blanket of fresh falling snow. Where my snug fitting helmet drowns out the constant river of minutia that continually babbles from my 10 year old daughter. To simply have a little “me” time.

So what the heck was I thinking, inviting all of these people with me??

It’s not what I was thinking, it’s what I knew: The more the merrier! This day on the slopes was meant to be shared, and I was going to have a blast with moms who have become friends and their sweet gals, too.

When it came time for my daughter to have her second round of ski lessons to help her become the pro she sees in her mind (see her first time here), I knew from experience she’d do best with her gaggle of gal pals.

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

Each year, Ski Utah offers a Ski Passport program that gives 5th graders the opportunity to ski at each of Utah’s 15 resorts three times during the ski season for a one-time processing fee of just $45. 6th graders can sign up too, receiving one pass to each of the 15 ski resorts.

Ali and her friends each had their Ski Passports in hand so it was a no-brainer we should have them all come up together.

But then I had an epiphany! Let’s make this a mom and daughter date and invite the moms along for the ride. Why should the kids be the only ones to have all the fun?

I’d skied with each of the girls together but this was a first with the moms. There are a few rules of thumb I followed in gathering this larger group together and I must say, it made the day a total success.

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

Invite Skiers of the Same Level

A group that skis together has fun together. Making sure each of the young girls were all at the same level of skiing was paramount to turning the day into a fun day instead of a purely teaching day. And that went for the moms too.

Two of us moms grew up skiing and had skied together before so that was a no-brainer. Two moms had taken up the sport just a few years before. One mom just switched over from snowboarding to skiing, she realized it was no fun to have to rescue your fallen daughter on skis while on a snowboard.

Not to worry, moguls and bumps for the two more experienced in the group have given way to long cruisers on Deer Valley’s perfectly groomed runs. We were more than happy to spend the day working on our turns with the rest of the crew.

For the girls, they had all been skiing together before and loved having their freedom of riding the lifts on their own. And us moms were more than happy to let them.

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

Take It Easy

With five moms who are used to being in charge, five girls who were beyond chatty with excitement and two cars with plenty of gear to keep straight, the decision was made early in the game to take it easy and don’t rush the morning. We put the girls all in one car with one mom driver so they could crank up the tunes and chit chat away while the other moms piled into the other car for a more leisure ride of discussing school politics, hair dye and the latest episode of Scandal.

Once we arrived at Deer Valley, we consciously didn’t rush. Nor did we have to. Everyone from the shuttle driver to the ticket agents and the lift operators made it simple for us to ease into our snow day.

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

Independence Day

Being together as moms and daughters doesn’t mean we had to be glued in pairs like animals on Noah’s Ark. Instead, the moms were happy to let our gals head up on the first chair on their own and leave us in their snow dust as we followed a few chairs behind.

As luck would have it and being the extra observant mothers that we are, one of us spied a single blue ski pole half buried in the snow under the chair. “I hope that isn’t ours,” said one mom, as the other mom immediately replied, “Oh no, it is. I bet it’s Katie’s.” “Yep,” we all agreed in unison. “If it’s anyone’s, it’s Katie’s.”

Long story short, we spent our first two laps on Silver Link ski run searching for the easiest route to gather Katie’s pole. But good moms (and daughters) that we are, there was no blaming, there was no sulking, it just became an adventure for us all to map out and go on together. Finally, we put in a call to Deer Valley Ski Patrol to retrieve it for us.

Saved!

Deer Valley Natural Buffet Snow Park Lodge

Ladies Who Lunch

With a few runs under our belts the girls were already asking for lunch. What? After operation pole retrieval It seemed like we’d just gotten there. But why fight it? Sure, let’s get some food in those bellies, because we all know a hungry kid is a grumpy kid. And truth be known, I knew what was in store so I was more than happy to belly up.

We headed back down to Snow Park Lodge for a feast. When Katie’s mom jokingly told her she’d packed her a peanut butter and jelly sandwich she almost fell off her of chair. As the most adventurous eater of the junior group, this was her favorite part of the day.

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

There was no shortage of variety for all of us to load our trays. As a fan of the Natural Buffet salad bar, I was pushing it like a used car salesman. Where else on a ski hill can you get a daily variety of ultra fresh salads to accent your baby greens? Italian Wheatberries and Tomato Salad, Rainbow Pasta and Shrimp Salad or Sczechan Eggplant Salad with baby kale, fried tofu and sugar snap peas! Not to mention steamed artichokes with saffron aioli and Deer Valley’s own housemade cheeses and an assortment of olives that made a meal in themselves.

Even so, two of the moms simply couldn’t resist Deer Valley’s famous Turkey Chili. And, really, why should they? It’s the best.

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

Grilled cheese, more turkey chili, and for our wonder-eater Katie, the special Ruben Cheese Burger rounded out our tastings.

Of course treating the girls to whatever dessert they wanted (carrot cake for my girl!) gave each of us moms a reason to ask for a bite (or five) as we discussed who was on what diet and how it was going. No blame here, we were working up an appetite.

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

Ditch the Kids

As every mom will tell you, we love our babes. But how great is it to put them into the capable hands of someone else so we could be on our own for a little faster paced afternoon?

Enter Letitia Lussier, a Deer Valley ski instructor since 1981, she knew exactly what motivated these girls and was ready to teach them a lesson or two that they wouldn’t usually hear—or listen to—from their dear old moms.

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

After assessing their abilities, Letitia took the girls down Silver Link and then over to Quincy Express and Silver Strike Express chairlifts, where they happily skied blue ski runs and discovered hidden trails through the trees. As moms will do, we followed along for a run or two and then headed off on our own girls day adventure.

It had begun to snow harder at this point, making for a fluffed layer of Utah’s famous light powder on the expertly groomed runs. We couldn’t have asked for more.

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

The moms made our way over to Empire Express and skied longer and faster than we had with our mini-me’s, giving our thighs and form the workout they both needed.

Or, something like that.

Before we knew it, it was time to head back to Snow Park to meet up with our gals and start the trek back home.

Why oh why did it have to end?

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

Take a Selfie

After finding our girlie group and thanking Letitia for an amazing day on both spectrums of the age range, we brought the cars up and readied ourselves for the ride home.

But first, of course, we posed for a selfie.

In this day and age you simply can’t escape getting a group photo (or 19) to document the day. And why would you?

Because these memories are what mom and daughter dates are made for.

Lessons for a Great Mother/Daughter Ski Day at Deer Valley Resort

What We Learned

Lily
Favorite part of the lesson: I really liked our ski instructor. “She told me to lean forward more and it just helped a lot.”

Favorite thing about Deer Valley: “My favorite part about skiing at Deer Valley was hanging out with all of my friends and their moms. The runs were really groomed. Yeah, it was awesome.”

Favorite lunch: “Cheeseburger and a chocolate chip cookie”

Sara
Favorite part of the lesson: “I liked learning how to ski the trees. She took us on more inclines and more steep hills, too. She helped us learn how to balance and keep more on our turns by bouncing and staying on one foot and on the balls of our feet with our knees and shoulders past our toes.

Favorite thing about Deer Valley: “The thing about Deer Valley is that the runs are really groomed and it just makes it a lot easier.”

Favorite lunch: “Grilled cheese and a chocolate croissant.”

Ali
Favorite part of the lesson: “My favorite thing was going through the trees like when we went into Bucky’s Front Yard and the other trails. That was the most challenging part of it. She taught us to stay far apart from everybody and that we can’t go close to each other, and for everybody to go at their own speed. And she told me to not lean back on my skis.”

Favorite part of Deer Valley: “I like the runs by Quincy Express chairlift the best. And riding the lift with my friends. And lunch. And it snowed!”

Favorite lunch: Turkey chili and carrot cake

Katie
Favorite part of the lesson: “The best thing I learned today was to balance on your skis more. The instructor first had us pick up our outside leg and then she had us stop and just pick up the other leg and then only have the tip of the ski on the ground and everything else up when we’re turning.”

Favorite part of Deer Valley: “They have a lot of area to ski and the bathrooms are super nice.”

Favorite lunch: “I got a special Ruben with cheese on it and chocolate chip cookie.”

Grace
Favorite part of the lesson: “I learned that you have to keep your body forward and that you have to ski aggressive!”

Favorite part of Deer Valley: “Probably going down Success ski run with my mom and the hills and how it’s so beautiful with beautiful trees in the mountains, and probably the food. I have so many things.”

Favorite lunch: I had the famous Turkey Chili with some bread and apple cider and a huge cookie. It was so good.”

For a list of kid’s trails, download the Kids Adventure Map here.

To sign up for Youth Ski School, visit here.

For a list of on-mountain dining options, visit here.

Heidi Larsen is the creator of foodiecrush.com, the blog and online magazine featuring family friendly recipes and inspiring photography. She also photographs Deer Valley Resort’s food and fine dining when not enjoying quality time on the ski hill with her husband and 10 year old daughter. See more of what she’s crushing on at Facebook and Instagram.

Deer Valley Resort’s Purchase of Solitude Mountain Resort Official

ADeer Valley Resort successfully closed on the purchase of Solitude Mountain Resort on April 30, 2015. As of today, May 1, 2015 Deer Valley will begin operating Solitude Mountain Resort in its entirety. Deer Valley Resort appointed Kim Mayhew as Solitude Mountain Resort’s new general manager in January, which also became effective today.

Primary_MountainResort_Yellow-Blue_041715

“This is an exciting venture for both Solitude Mountain Resort and Deer Valley Resort,” said Kim Mayhew, general manager of Solitude Mountain Resort. “As a member of the Deer Valley team for more than 30 years, I look forward to sharing with Solitude Resort similar values and practices that make Deer Valley one of the best operated resorts in the country.”

“Solitude is an incredible resort and will be in great hands with Kim at the helm,” said Bob Wheaton, president and general manager of Deer Valley Resort. “Deer Valley staff worked hand-in-hand with Solitude staff this past winter to share knowledge and develop strong plans for the future.”

Deer Valley’s first capital improvement announcement to Solitude for the 2015-2016 ski season will be to remove the current Summit double chairlift and install a new detachable high-speed quad.

Also, a new ski run will be cut from the top of the existing Apex Express chairlift to the bottom terminal of the realigned Summit Express chairlift, significantly lessening the current travel time to Honeycomb Canyon. Other priority improvements include; remodeling the Moonbeam Lodge restaurant, an increased guest service presence throughout the resort and new uniforms for Solitude staff.

For more information about Deer Valley’s purchase of Solitude Mountain Resort, please visit DeerValley.com. 

Deer Valley Resort’s President and General Manager Bob Wheaton, reviews the 2014 – 2015 ski season

Deer Valley Resort’s President and General Manager Bob Wheaton, gives a review of the 2014 – 2015 ski season and invites you to come #SkiTheDifference in the 2015 – 2016 season. Presented by The Ski Channel.

Deer Valley Resort and Stein Eriksen Receive Governor’s State of Sport Awards

Deer Valley Resort and its Director of Skiing, Stein Eriksen, both received awards at the fourth annual Governor’s State of Sport Awards Dinner, hosted by the Utah Sports Commission and presented by Zions Bank.

04212015 State of Sport 025

Honoring Utah’s sports achievements and celebrating Utah’s sports community, the Utah Sports Commission has awarded Deer Valley Resort the 2015 Partner of the Year Award. The Utah Sports Commission’s success is shared by many key partners and friends within Utah’s sports industry. The Partner of the Year Award recognizes the extraordinary efforts, resources and other support from sponsors, venues, hospitality, community, local organizing committees, events rights holders, volunteers and others in Utah’s sports industry who contribute valuable assistance in continuing to establish Utah as The State of Sport and enhance its Olympic Legacy. Past recipients include Zions Bank and the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association.

04212015 State of Sport 041

“Deer Valley has been a valuable partner in helping sustain Utah’s Olympic legacy,” said Jeff Robbins, president and CEO of the Utah Sports Commission. “Since hosting a large portion of the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, Deer Valley has continued to host World Cups and World Championships, inviting the world’s best freestyle athletes back year after year and showcasing this renowned venue to the world.”

04212015 State of Sport 036In its 34-year history, Deer Valley Resort has consistently ranked #1 in SKI Magazine’s reader’s poll, as well as garnered countless additional awards and recognitions, such as being named United States Best Ski Resort by the World Ski Awards. During the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, Deer Valley Resort was host to the men’s and women’s freestyle aerial, freestyle mogul and alpine slalom events and has hosted the 2003 and 2011 Freestyle World Championships. The Resort is a favorite stop on

the Freestyle World Cup circuit each year and each of these events bring significant economic impact and exposure to the state of Utah.

Olympic Gold Medalist and Deer Valley’s Director of Skiing, Stein Eriksen, received the Governor’s State of Sport Lifetime Achievement Award for his outstanding contributions to skiing and sports in Utah. The award is given to those who have made significant contributions in advancing and promoting sports that serve to enhance the quality of life for Utah citizens. Past recipients include Larry H. Miller (posthumously), Spencer F. Eccles, Billy Casper and Jack Nicklaus.

04212015 State of Sport 022

“It is an honor to pay tribute to one of Utah’s most iconic sports figures for his contribution to the sport of skiing in Utah and across the Intermountain Ski Areas,” said Robbins. “Stein has garnered recognition the world over for his pioneering spirit in the sport of skiing and we are proud he has called Utah home since 1969.”

As the most recognized name in the ski world, Stein Eriksen has been synonymous with skiing style and elegance for more than half a century. The first alpine skier to win triple gold at a world championship, an Olympic Gold Medalist and ambassador and father of freestyle skiing, Eriksen has parlayed all that he knows and loves about the sport into an incredible career that has spanned almost six decades and changed the face of alpine skiing worldwide. The patriarch of elegant skiing, Eriksen successfully utilized his passion for skiing into a lifetime career and helped cultivate the internationally-renowned luxury hotel, which bears his name, located mid-mountain at Deer Valley Resort.

04212015 State of Sport 039

Both awards were presented last night, Tuesday, April 21 at the Governor’s State of Sport Awards Dinner held at EnergySolutions Arena. Utah Gov. Gary R. Herbert provided welcoming remarks and presented the special awards to Deer Valley and Stein Eriksen. Acclaimed entertainer and motorsports enthusiast Jay Leno was also in attendance to help celebrate Utah’s best athletic achievements for the 2014 calendar year.

For more information about the Governor’s State of Sports Awards, please visit the State of Sport Awards website here.

Carving Skis, Powder Skis and Skis In Between

I often look at my ski rack and wonder what I could change to make skiing even more fun and a little easier. In other words, which ski do I really need? This basic question conjured up so many parameters that just one simple answer seemed totally impossible. But I was determined to find out and what follows is the story of my search for the perfect ski.

dvr-rossi5

I began by visiting the Rossignol North American Headquarters, right here in Park City, Utah. I spent some time with Nick Castagnoli, communication and public relations officer for the brand. Deer Valley Resort works closely with Rossignol, one of the world’s leading equipment manufacturers, both at its Empire Test Center and also in all of its ski rental operations. Nick took me to the showroom where next winter’s collection was already on display. Needless to say that I was overwhelmed by the breadth of models available, but his expertise quickly brought some order to my confused mind.

dvr-rossi1

He first introduced the carving skis, Rossignol’s new Pursuit line. “These are pure carving tools,” said Nick, “Their mid-sole dimensions only range from 71 to 73 mm. These are fast edge-to-edge. You barely roll your ankle and you’re gone.” He immediately saw that this wasn’t quite my type of ski and explained that the carving and powder ski categories were bridged by a wonderful family of All-Mountain skis, called the Experience Series for men and the Temptation Series for women. “From coast-to-coast these skis represent the majority of our sales. They stand as benchmark of versatility for consumers. Not everyone skis deep powder.” added Nick.

I asked what might be the best width for me in the Experience line and Nick suggested that I try a few different versions at the Rossignol High Performance Test Center at Deer Valley Resort. I also asked what seemed to be the practical range of acceptable ski width (this is measured in millimeters under the foot at the mid-section of the ski) for the kind of skiing I was doing. Nick just smiled and said: “We’ve seen all kinds of widths in recent years, but the pendulum always swings back. Today from 85 to 110 mm seems to be where it’s at!”

dvr-rossi2

Nick skis on the Soul 7, a powder ski, the other flagship of the Rossignol line. “Skiers want a ski that’s versatile. Something that works for any occasion. The Soul 7 is an aspirational ski; Everyone wants to become a good powder skier.” He went on to explain the distinctive, longer lightweight (air) tip in that series of skis designed to minimize swing-weight and also match the rocker location. Nick explained, “weight is a big deal for us. Lightweight is the trend these days, so we are working hard at making both our skis and bindings significantly lighter, which in turn makes skiing much easier without compromising performance.”

dvr-rossi3

My meeting with Nick Castagnoli brought me one step closer to understanding what would be the perfect ski for me. But since I didn’t want to leave any stone unturned, I returned to the Rossignol High Performance Test Center, located near the Empire Canyon Lodge at Deer Valley Resort. I had paid one visit in January and needed to refresh my memory.

dvr-rossi4

I wanted to ski again on the Soul 7, Rossignol’s best-selling freeride ski (the Savory 7 is the women’s equivalent). If you’re not familiar with the term freeride, simply equate it to powder or deep snow skiing. This very distinctive yellow ski spans over backcountry, freestyle and powder skiing. Its particular “rocker” design is meant to prevent tip flapping and brings an effortless flotation. Because of this the ski literally plows its way through the most challenging snow conditions, from bottomless powder to forbidding crud and even spring snow. The ski also does a decent job on hard-pack but this is not where I would primarily use it. I particularly liked its tip that projects higher up, offering an added feature when going over unknown terrain in fresh snow or extremely deep moguls.

dvr-rossi6

Since I don’t spend much time skiing hard-pack, I didn’t look at or test the carving skis that Rossignol offers in this product category. I was looking for the everyday Deer Valley ski, that I think I found in the Experience series. I just want my skis to initiate easily when I take them in tight forested spots and yet I need them to be stable when I happen to find myself on groomed runs, which is where I often end up during the early and late portions of the season. The rest of the time my favorite playground is natural terrain, trees, crud (mostly) and powder of variable depth each time mother nature programs a snowfall!

I remember trying both the Experience 84 and 88. The 88 was the one I liked the most. I found it to be very versatile for my type of skiing and solid enough in terms of quickness and stability. It can carve when it has to and is very responsive, perhaps because of its more subtle rocker design. I also found it quite stable and easy to control when it had to plow through changing snow conditions or transition from smooth to bumpy terrain.

dvr-rossi7

That’s it; I have determined that the Experience 88 is the perfect ski for me. Doing a little homework was worth it and made me confident that I didn’t have to make much compromise as I have done so many times before. I’m satisfied that I have made the perfect choice, found the right equipment for me, and can already look forward to the next ski season! I hope this helps you choose your perfect ski too. 

Five Things I’ve learned this season

We learn a lot each season about skiing. As the 2014-2015 winter comes to a close, here are five of my key “take-away” that I want to share with you.

5.  Always Keep Hoping

Last December I was expecting countless days of bottomless powder that mother nature seemed to have a difficult time dispensing. All season long I kept looking forward to “face shots” in spite of an indifferent weather forecast, unexciting predictions from the Farmer’s Almanac and the fatalistic attitudes of many of my friends. To further protect me against the fear of drought, I pushed back any thoughts of perfect bluebird days (we got many of these) and tried instead to focus on that pesky jet stream. In hopes it would redirect its precipitation towards Utah. Obviously, none of my wishful thinking worked too well and I hope it didn’t upset Mother Nature. Since I’m an optimist, I don’t think I did. I was just doing a steady job hoping and in the end, it worked to a large degree because I skied plenty of good snow this winter.

dvr-Five1

4. A bird in the Hand is Worth Two in the Bush

My main season’s objective was to ski 100 days! I had never done it before in a non-professional capacity, so I was determined to achieve it. I must admit that when one lives in Park City it’s extremely hard not to become complacent in getting out to ski. For many of us, the sky is never perfectly blue and the snow never fluffy or deep enough. This year became the “no excuse” winter. No matter what the weather or the snow was said to be, I went out, did my skiing and without one single exception ended up pleasantly surprised. I was always glad I did it! Each of my ski outings always exceeded my expectations and I have surpassed my goal!

dvr-Five2

3. Skiing is All About Terrain and Exploration

Too much snow can make us a bit lazy. Normally curvy, bumpy and otherwise varied terrain, looks like a flat surface on top of six feet of snow. Conversely, a thinner cover exposes more of the terrain. It shows every single little detail and nooks and crannies come in full view. This is what tempts me to explore and play in new terrain. In fact, a little bit less snow than usual reveals more of the terrain’s true texture. It also forces us to discover subtle passages into the trees, a stash of powder that no one even knew existed, an interesting short-cut, or a new path that even the most seasoned Deer Valley skier never suspected.

dvr-Five3

2. Don’t Let Your First Run Define Your Ski Day

This winter I sometimes found it difficult to warm up as I began my ski day. My first few runs were more awkward, not as smooth and more tentative than my last run from the day before. I had noticed some of this in the past but it seems that it came out much more acutely this season. After a few more runs, my normal feelings returned and took over for the rest of the outing. It might be the simple reality that we all need to warm up or recover this animal instinct that makes us ski, as if we had been secretly endowed with that wonderful skill at birth.
dvr-Five4

1. Easy Does It

Skiing is a wonderful way to have lots of fun outside. For some skiers the experience can be one of contemplation. For many it’s the thrill of gliding and the sensation of freedom that feels like almost flying. For many proficient skiers, it’s a combination of speed, strength and perfect execution. It’s fair to say that most skiers over exert and use up far too much energy when they are on the slopes. For life-long skiers like myself who no longer are as young and vivacious, skiing can still be enjoyable as a fusion of smooth and efficient execution. It behooves us to remain super-light and always fluid on the snow. This is a bit difficult to describe. It’s a blend of minimalism, lightness and very subtle gestures. In fact smooth skiing resembles piloting. Skiers drive their skis where they want them to go and let the forces of gravity do the heavy lifting. Granted, they need muscle strength but mostly to resist compression, accelerations and maintain an edge. Skiing effortlessly, just like a feather on the snow, has become my ultimate creed!

dvr-Five5

Chicks on Sticks 2015

Okay, I’m just going to go ahead and say it—whoever came up with the phrase “No Friends on a Powder Day,” never met my friends. I don’t want to brag, but I have hands down, the best friends, because they all agree that the best way to enjoy powder is with each other. Last year, our annual Chicks on Sticks outing occurred on an epic powder day, and it’s safe to say that the powder would have been less enjoyable without each other’s company.

IMG_8912

As it turns out, you don’t need tons and tons of powder to have an epic day—as long as you have great company. I met up with Miriam, Stacey, Mir and Kellie in Snow Park Lodge at Deer Valley Resort. We lingered, just a bit over coffee, and then suited up. Stacey had been out most recently, and told us where the best skiing was. So, off we went to find it.

Let me say this, too. I had made sure to advertise the day as a mellow one—“Guys, remember, it’s all about lunch,” I wrote in one email. “So I don’t want to hear, ‘my knee hurts, so I can’t come,’ or ‘I can’t keep up with you!’”

Well, on the one hand, I meant every word of it. On the other hand—our definition of “mellow day,” may, in fact, contradict the term, “mellow.”

I could not wait to to try out my new boots. Mir was the first to notice: “Hey, you’re in the perfect position,” she said, as we skied down Star Gazer. “You’re skiing great.”

With my ego duly stoked, I set about ripping up the mountain.

In truth, our group skied quite companionably, and pressure-free, at our own paces. I think this is the secret to a good, social skiing day—coming down the mountain safely, comfortably, and at your own pace. The fact that I was trying to rip up the mountain, was, in fact, my own internal pressure meter pushed up to “high.” By the next day, this would prove to be a boneheaded strategy, but while I was skiing, I couldn’t have had more fun.

IMG_8910

The only thing better than the skiing that day was the chairlift rides. We mixed it up, and talked about everything from business to writing, kids and spouses, skiing and travel. And while some years we plan an elaborate sit-down lunch, this year, we decided that we felt like keeping it casual. We ate at the Snow Park Restaurant, where the awesome conversation continued.

Sadly, I had to cut out early to take care of a sick kiddo at home. I had planned to go home and then return to the mountain to pick up my healthy child at ski school, but my friends offered, generously, to ski until pickup time and bring him home for me. See? Told you, I have the best friends.

Lunch at Silver Lake

There are many ways to enjoy a great lunch at the Silver Lake Lodge. There are three Restaurants in this lodge; Bald Mountain Pizza, Royal Street Café and Silver Lake Restaurant. I wish I could tell you how wonderful every one of them was in great detail. For this article we’ll focus mostly on Silver Lake Restaurant.

dvr-SlvlkLunch1

To make this food review more fun, I have asked five Deer Valley skiers about their lunch experience at Silver Lake Restaurant. As you read on, you’ll discover that each experience varies a lot depending on the circumstances, the company, the mood, the weather and what happened that day.

dvr-SlvlkLunch2

Debbie from Florida:

The snow that began early this morning is still falling at noon and is likely to continue all day. No sitting on the deck today! The kids went straight to the Bald Mountain Pizza in search for some pizza and pasta. My husband and I picked a nice table just by the fireplace, we can use the rest. We’ve been playing all morning around Flagstaff Mountain, exploring the glades along Red Cloud chairlift and getting a few face shots! Now we just need to warm up a bit with a visit to the Soups and Stews station. I’ll go for the Turkey Chili and some fresh veggies while my husband is considering the roast sirloin, the sun-dried tomato soup, and may also pick the jumbo baked potato with fresh salsa and turkey chili toppings. Maybe dessert after if we can find room! 

dvr-SlvlkLunch3

Greg from Texas:

Since today is our first day, we need to acclimate a bit and start progressively. We’re so fortunate to have such a postcard day with new snow and a deep blue sky. We decided to stop at 11:45 a.m. for an early lunch and get a table on the outdoor deck in full sun. My wife and I chose the Natural Salad Buffet. We both feel good and want to eat as much green as possible, spiced up with caper berries, olives and herbs. I know that I’ll go with some oriental veggies, while my wife is eyeing a piece of fresh bread and perhaps a small serving of penne pasta salad. I may also make a quick stop at the bakery and pick a jumbo cookie to cap off our first lunch on the mountain!

dvr-SlvlkLunch4

Monika from New Jersey:

Another “bluebird” day, we’ve planned for lunch break at the Silver Lake Restaurant! We found a table right on the deck facing Bald Mountain. Five non-stop laps on Nabob and Keno ski runs have worked up my appetite. While my friends may be going for some soup and some chili, I’m headed towards the grill for a hamburger and a large serving of fries. Since I’ve been such a good trooper all morning, I feel that I deserve to take a longer lunch and may indulge in a local beer as well! My friends have pointed the bakery area out to me and I already know that it will be quasi-impossible not to stop by it. If I do, and deep inside I know I will, I’ll pick up a chocolate silk pie that I’ll share with Sarah. It may take some time before we step back into my skis again this afternoon, but we’ll make it up tomorrow!

dvr-SlvlkLunch5

Frank from California:

It’s still snowing so my buddies and I have been exploring the Daly Chutes and skiing Ontario Bowl non-stop. I was a little hesitant when I dropped into Chute 10; but I guess peer pressure helped a lot! We’re all famished and the four of us decided to make a stop at The Carvery and really take care of our sudden hunger. Today’s roast is a marinated New York strip served with béarnaise that, with a slice of German chocolate cake, will go a long way in restoring my strength. Just add a draft beer each to that!

dvr-SlvlkLunch6

Karrie from Missouri:

We can only ski until two and need to pack soon to catch our flight back home. Lunch will be from the Silver Lake Restaurant Deli. I enjoyed skiing Mayflower with Eddie, my instructor. I got a made-to-order deli sandwich with house roasted turkey breast, accompanied with some yummy condiments. A good cup of coffee along with a slice of fruit pie will keep my attention and give me the physical strength needed, not so much to end my ski day, but to leave this wonderful place!

dvr-SlvlkLunch7