Take Home Deer Valley Turkey Chili

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“Can I have the recipe?”

That’s what my friend said when I dropped off a container of my “take home and make at home” Deer Valley Turkey Chili for her.  The package was enough for 10 people so I wrapped up some for my friend and left it on her doorstep for her family to enjoy.

“We can go one step further than that!  The mix is available at Deer Valley Grocery~Café,” I responded.

Many visitors to Deer Valley Resort look forward to the turkey chili just as much as they enjoy the skiing!  Being new to skiing, I didn’t really know about this tradition until I overheard several different groups of people on the chairlifts talking about how much they were looking forward to it!  Once I tried the turkey chili at Silver Lake Lodge, I knew why.

Since my husband had shoulder surgery, he wasn’t able to get up to the resort so I decided to surprise him with a special treat. I brought the chili to him. Though I am not a very good cook, (I readily admit defeat in this area), even I was able to make the world famous turkey chili with the help of the special take home spice pack kit!

Here’s how it went:

Beans were soaked overnight and rinsed.

A few ingredients were purchased at the store and chopped up in (relatively) even pieces.

Browned the turkey, boiled some chicken broth on the stove, added the spices and the ingredients, simmered for a half hour or so and served.  Even Nancy Anderson was able to do it!

You can pick up your Take Home Turkey Chili packages at  Deer Valley Grocery~Café.

After you try it, let us know if yours was as tasty as ours!


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Wendy Chioji’s Deer Valley Difference

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Wendy is a Deer Valley Mountain Host, two-time cancer survivor, speaker and athlete for the Livestrong Foundation. She summited Kilimanjaro with the Livestrong Survivor Summit, this past February.

JF: What did you do before joining Deer Valley Resort?

Wendy: I was in television news; for twenty years. I was a newscaster in Orlando, Florida, and I decided this was no longer what I wanted to do, it wasn’t fulfilling my passion anymore. So I moved to Park City to work at my friend’s bicycle shop. I first did some coaching for indoor cycling, some triathlon training and then three years ago I was lucky enough to get the job of Mountain Host at Deer Valley Resort.

JF: What attracted you to that job and what were you expecting from it?

Wendy: Let me first say that Mountain Host is a very hard job to get. When I interviewed for it, I was told that it was the best job in Park City but also the most difficult to land because no one ever leaves it! I took it because it was putting two of my passions together; meeting and communicating with people as well as skiing.

JF: Were your expectations met?

Wendy: I expected to be able to meet a lot of really fun, really cool people, as guests and colleagues, and my expectations have been far surpassed! I work with some of the most creative, funny, smart people that I’ve ever met, and I’ve met really great guests on the mountain as well.

JF: What have you learned from that position?

Wendy: I’m a shotgun thinker; I think kind of all over the map at the same time, but in this job, you have to be logical and sequential in giving tours, in helping in emergencies or even in telling people how to get to the Trail’s End Lodge when you’re standing in front of a map. This experience has taught me to be much more efficient and streamlined in my thinking. Yes, it has added a lot to my life skills!

JF: Was the learning curve challenging?

Wendy: Even though I had skied Deer Valley for years, I didn’t know all the names of the runs and lifts. This, alone, is very intimidating; so the first thing I did was try to memorize where everything was. It was a crash course in directions and everybody who knows me, is aware that I have a very limited sense of directions, so this actually is another great take-away that I received from Deer Valley!

JF: Were there any staff members that helped you along the way to build your skills and knowledge as a Mountain Host?

Wendy: All my supervisors were incredibly helpful and accessible all the time, always answering my phone calls and texts whenever I needed help. The Ski Patrol folks were also incredibly wonderful, friendly and always happy to help. I have actually never ran into a single person that wasn’t happy and ready to help in Deer Valley!

JF: What would you say to someone looking for a position at Deer Valley; what would it take to be a happy employee?

Wendy: I think you have to passionate about the job; you must really love people and love skiing, you have to be energetic, outgoing, just love the outdoors and above all, be authentic. You cannot fake it and work here!

JF: In your own words, how would you describe the “Deer Valley Difference?”

Wendy: To me the Deer Valley Difference is being authentic; the people who work here make a huge difference for the guests because they love it and want them to love it too. Because I think the carrot cake at Deer Valley is the best one on the planet I want everybody to try it. So the Deer Valley Difference is being authentic and it’s so easy to communicate that passion when you love the resort as much as we all do.

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Deer Valley’s Steeps and Stashes

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Secrets Revealed

If you believe you know Deer Valley Resort inside-out, you might be missing out on a whole lot of fun! To make sure that no stone is left unturned in the 2,026 skiable acres that Deer Valley has to offer, there is now a simple solution within your reach: enroll into Deer Valley Resort’s new ski school clinic “Steeps and Stashes,” and you’ll get a clear insider view into the myriad of secrets and untold ski runs Deer Valley has in store for its visiting guests.

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Call this, skiing off the beaten path, taking the trails less traveled or exploring a new world of ski possibilities, but when you enroll in this eye-opening program you’ll discover, as I did, that almost half of Deer Valley acreage is tree skiing! I would never have guessed it! Tree skiing isn’t just about the fun of slaloming through aspen and evergreen trees, but it’s also penetrating into a micro-climate where the snow stays better and for much longer, as it generally remains sheltered from the sun, the wind, and also because most skiers who aren’t in the know will seldom venture there on their own.

For visitors and locals alike

“Knowledge is power” and the more you know about a ski resort, the more emotionally invested you become in its assets and the more valuable it becomes to you, your friends and your family. Knowing a resort well, is not just for the out-of-town visitor, but for locals too, who often believe they know Deer Valley like the back of their hand while, in reality, what they know only represents the tip of the iceberg. This was just as true for me when I signed up for the program. As an almost 30 year Park City resident, I didn’t suspect that I could learn so much about new, fun spots on that mountain. All it took was a couple of days to turn that paradigm on its head.

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Great skiing starts with a good group

We first gathered on Saturday morning in the 2002 Room in the Snow Park Lodge, where we met other participants and our ski instructors. At 9 a.m. sharp, we found ourselves at the base of Carpenter Express chairlift. We rode the chairlift together and after taking us down “Big Stick,” the instructors broke us up into groups of similar levels and affinities.

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We ended up with three groups. I don’t know exactly what the other groups did that morning, but Thor, our instructor took us up to the top of Bald Mountain and since there was a fresh serving of new powder from the day before, he led us down into Sunset Glade, an expansive aspen grove that I’ve never been too familiar with. To my delight, I discovered many lines and stashes that I didn’t even suspect existed.

We then proceeded to Quincy Express chairlift, we zoomed down Bandana ski run and set up shop around Empire Express chairlift. We first tested the powder around Anchor Trees. I liked it a lot and migrated for more tree skiing to the X-Files, where we took two great consecutive runs. All along, Thor gave us some valuable tips aimed at helping us stay nimble and weave smoothly around the giant evergreens.

After the trees, the steep!

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Soon, it was time to move from these secret stashes to the steep component of the program. We peaked over the intimidating cornice that lines up Daly Bowl, wondering if we’d muster the audacity to let us drop down into the steep slope below. Thor led us by sheer example and then, the peer pressure pulled the trigger; one after the other, we all took the plunge and boy, were we proud we did it! 

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After a communal lunch at Silver Lake Lodge, we continued to explore the infinite forest that seem to line every single run Deer Valley has to offer. While I had already experienced many of our morning runs, most of the afternoon paths Thor took us to were either totally new to me or brought a brand new twist to some old spots that I had explored before. Deer Valley has so many “powder stashes” that I wouldn’t want to write a comprehensive guide about them; it would take almost forever to list them all!

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The March afternoon sun combined with a relentless rhythm soon began to weigh on our legs and it was time to go back to Snow Park Lodge where we were shown some instruction videos that came in quite handy, as our experience of the day was still fresh in our minds and made us relate perfectly to the situations we all had encountered hours earlier.

Day Two: Moguls on the Menu

Sunday came a bit too early as we had little time to adapt from the spring time-change, losing one hour of sleep in the process, but this didn’t dampen our enthusiasm for this second day of “Steeps and Stashes.” I was invited to move to another group, led by John, another Deer Valley instructor. While the previous day had been centered on powder and steep terrain, it was now time to perfect our mogul technique on a variety of trails ranging from Empire Bowl, all the way over to Mayflower Bowl.

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I used to like bumps when I was much younger and today, as my body has lost some of its flexibility, I carefully avoid confronting their destabilizing nature on almost any ski slope. This time, John found the right words and added some effective tips to reconcile me with that wavy and uneven terrain called moguls.

“Shopping for Turns” anyone?

That morning, John kept on discouraging us to endlessly “shop for turns,” an expression that means waiting forever for the perfect spot, the right conditions and the good moment to initiate a turn. This also means that when we do this, we eventually run out of real estate and end up on the edge of the run, still “looking.”

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Instead, he showed us how to “ski the zipper,” the holy grail of mogul skiing. If this terminology sounds a little odd, just remember that the “zipper line” means that great bump skiers go straight down the mountain, allowing their knees to flex over the moguls instead of turning around them. That’s what is called the zipper line. It’s named that way because skiers remain within a narrow corridor that’s only as wide as their shoulders are broad.

Seeing is believing

What a bumpy day this Sunday ended up being! We did easy mogul trails in the morning and John gradually increased the gradient throughout the day. Eventually he took us just under the Red Cloud chairlift where we were filmed on video, doing our very best to “ski the zipper.” Just before noon, John stopped us at the Deer Valley video cabin theater, right off the edge of Success ski run, where we were given an opportunity to marvel at our own exploits along with those of our teammates.The whole session was commented in details by John, questions were asked and the whole video was seen at least three times before we were finally satisfied.

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After lunch, the session continued, mostly under the mogul theme, sometime on easy terrain, sometimes on steeper runs and by 4 p.m. we were all a little tired but extremely happy that we had completed a wonderful two-day ski clinic. We learned a lot about Deer Valley Resort’s boundless powder and tree skiing. We tame our innate fears on Daly Bowl, reconciled ourselves with the secrets of mogul skiing and picked up so many new skills that we can’t wait to do it over again very soon!

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Deer Valley Resort to Host U.S. Freestyle Championships

The U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association has announced Deer Valley Resort as the site for the 2014 USANA U.S. Freestyle Championships held Friday, March 28, through Sunday, March 30, 2014. Deer Valley’s World Cup venue will host U.S. athletes coming together for the final event of the 2013-2014 season to battle it out for the title of U.S. Champion. The Championship event, originally scheduled to take place at Heavenly Valley, CA, will include moguls, dual moguls and aerials.

“Deer Valley® is pleased to be able to step in and host the U.S. Freestyle Championships for our partners at the U.S. Ski Team,” said Bob Wheaton, president and general manager for Deer Valley Resort. “We are excited to showcase the athletes right on the heels of the 2014 Winter Games and offer our guests a chance to see them compete live.”

Leading the team for the championship event in moguls are Deer Valley sponsored athletes, 2010 bronze medalist Bryon Wilson and his brother, 2014 Olympian Brad Wilson (both of Butte, MT). Two-time Olympian Ashley Caldwell (Ashburn, VA) will lead the aerials team, along with Olympian Mac Bohonnon (Madison, CT), who finished fifth in Sochi. Deer Valley Resort is one of the world’s most renowned freestyle venues, having played host to the World Championships twice and is a perennial stop on the FIS Freestyle World Cup tour.“Deer Valley is the preeminent venue worldwide in freestyle skiing and will provide the platform for a great conclusion to the Olympic season,” said Calum Clark, vice president, events for USSA.

 2014 USANA U.S. Freestyle Championships Schedule 

  • Men’s and women’s moguls qualifications and finals will take place Friday, March 28 from 9:55 a.m. to 3:50 p.m. 
  • Men’s and women’s aerials qualifications and finals will be held Saturday, March 29  from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • Men’s and women’s dual moguls finals will finish the event on Sunday, March 30 from 11:40 a.m. to 3:10 p.m. .
 All events during the 2014 USANA U.S. Freestyle Championships are spectator-friendly and free to the public. A complete schedule of events can be found on Deer Valley’s website.

Nastar Magic

One fine Monday, I found myself out skiing with my kids. Or, dare I say, out-skied by my kids.  I’m pretty fast, when I want to be, but on this day, I felt like I was skiing in  molasses. This, friends, is not to say the snow conditions were not perfect. They were. Therein lay part of the problem. So lovely was the snow, so bluebird the day, my kids were zooming around the hill like Mario Andretti on a country road—or at least how I imagine a racecar driver would take a country road.

None of this, by the way, is said by way of complaint. It is a point of pride that my kids engage with this sport, and love it as much as their parents do. And, I’m telling you, this is the year our family ski days turned a corner (if I’m to drag that racecar metaphor out for another go-round). No longer are we enduring endless laps on Wide West. Gone are the days of one-run-and-done. Our family can take a trip down nearly any intermediate run without hesitation.

So, when we took some laps off of Flagstaff Mountain, and then Bald Mountain, I was in my glory. Except for the fact that they were moving so quickly (sometimes in a little tuck), that I was in constant “worried mother” mode. It wasn’t that I needed to ski fast to keep up, it was that it was nearly impossible to “hover and sweep” to protect them from other skiers who may not expect pint-sized Speed Racers, however well-skilled they may be.

As I chased them down Birdseye ski run, delighted by their enthusiasm for the run, I wondered, “What if I could channel this energy, this need for speed?”

Would it shock you to learn that my boys were, ahem, ahead of me?

“Mom! Look! It’s the Nastar Course! May we race, please?”

What if, indeed.

I raced NASTAR as a kid—it’s a grass-roots public recreational ski race program. The largest in the world, as a matter of fact. And I remember the thrill of coming down the course off the “Triple Chair” run at Pico, and hearing my name called. My kids have run the Deer Valley Nastar course before, along with courses at other resorts, but they wanted to show off for me.

Race

This, friends, was a boon. A boon, I tell you. Not only did they do laps on this course, but I got to do a couple of quick runs down Little Reb ski run, solo, to wait for them at the bottom. Fewer more lovely words were ever spoken, at least on that day, than “Wait for them at the bottom.” Here, they could ski fast, to their hearts’ content, and I could simply enjoy watching them. No other skiers on the course, except my cute boys. Even the announcer got in on the game, “Here’s Lance and Seth, and their Mom at the bottom taking pictures for future Facebook posts,” he called out on the first run.

The fun thing is, we got to ski together before and after each run. Because, of course, one boy earned a medal, and we had to go to the top of the course to collect it. Then, the other wanted to try for a medal, and then they both earned medals, and we had to go back up to the top of the course and collect them. So, we’d ski down McHenry ski run to the Wasatch chairlift, ride it up, ski Birdseye or Nabob ski runs down to the top of the course, and repeat the process. Finally, after three races, I called the Costanza Rule, and declared it time to find our way to the car. “You can race more for Daddy this weekend,” I said, explaining that we’d be back as a foursome in a few short days.

And then, we were off to Little Stick ski run, and I was back on Mommy Patrol. Hilariously, there were several skiers on the trail who identified my plight. “You just have to hope,” one woman said, helpfully, as she watched me attempt to keep my kids safe. “Wow! They are great!” said another couple, navigating the bottle neck at the bottom of the first section of Little Stick. “Thanks!” I shouted over my shoulder. “You should see them race!”

Girl’s Weekend – Ski Rental Makes Life Easy and, in Our Case, Memorable.

What do you pack for your girl’s ski weekend? Well, everything of course! You need bibs and ski jacket or two, under layers for warmth, choices of outfits for dinners out and your après ski boots. My girlfriends from California were so sweet to pack hostess gifts (yeah!), a bottle of my favorite Old Vine Zinfandel and a Barbera from the California wine country.

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Let’s see what else? Girls have to have their hair care products, make up, and skin care goodies. Plenty of fashion accessories are necessary so we can all share when we are getting ready to go out for dinner. Do you think there was much room in their suitcases for ski boots? Not really. As I suspected, their suitcases were completely packed so they had to sit on them to close the zippers!

Knowing this might happen, ahead of time I set them up with ski rentals from Deer Valley’s Ski Rental shop. Who wants so schlep their stuff on the plane and check an extra bag for skis and poles? Besides, their equipment is quite a few years old, and this gave them a chance to try new technology. Bonuses: less stuff to carry, fewer baggage fees and opportunity to test new equipment.

Here is how it went:

Preparation: I made a call to the Deer Valley Rental shop with my friend’s names, ages, height, weight, and ski ability. Then I reserved rentals for them during their stay. Confirmations were emailed back and we were good to go.

Morning of Day 1: Since they were set up and I knew they’d be well taken care of, I dropped them off at Snow Park to get started. “See those guys dressed in green?” I said. “Have them point you to the rental shop and I’ll meet you down there.” Then I parked the car and grabbed the shuttle.

By the time I met up with them, they were already through registration with boots in hand, and were getting their skis and poles. Deer Valley Rental shop wants to get every customer through their rental experience in 5 – 10 minutes so they can get out and enjoy the snow. My girlfriends were floored it was so quick and easy. We headed to the boot warmers and hit Wide West ski run to warm up!

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End of Day 1: We handed our skis and poles to the valet for free overnight storage at Snow Park Lodge. No schlepping boots either; we loved that we could leave the boots with the basket concierge for free overnight storage, too. Boots were placed in the baskets, and off we went.

Morning of Day 2: These girls were antsy to get back out there. They wanted to get in as many runs as possible so we arrived just after the resort opened. My friends quickly put on their matching rental boots, grabbed a basket to store our shoes and we were off. On the stairs, the girls were walking a little funny but I shrugged it off as being a little sore from the long day skiing the day before.

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At the base of the Carpenter chairlift, my 5’2” friend Lynn was really having trouble getting her skis on. I said to her, “Lynn, set your skis sideways on the hill. They are sliding backwards.” She shot me a look that said, “I am not stupid! I know that.” She seemed a little agitated (which is not like her) so I popped out of my skis and went to investigate.

Her boots weren’t clicking into her bindings. It didn’t make any sense since she’d skied on them yesterday. The bindings looked too small. Then 5’7” Heidi couldn’t get her skis on either. Her bindings looked too big.

Einstein here (yeah, that was me) wasn’t connecting the dots either. I said, “Do you have the right skis?” Yep. Heidi’s skis had her name of them and so did Lynn’s. Ok. It’s not the skis. The three of us (normally fairly intelligent people) all deducted that it must be the bindings!

So we take the equipment back to the rental shop to investigate the bindings. We meet up with Deer Valley ski technician Howard Ritter who helps Lynn. He pulls up her information and grabs a boot the same size (then she won’t have to take off her boot – very thoughtful.) He checks the boot and binding. “This fits. Let’s take a look at your boot.” We both look down at the personalized sticker on her boot. It doesn’t match the ski.

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Two stations down, Heidi’s technician is telling her that the boots she has on aren’t hers. Heidi says, “WHAT HAPPENED TO MY BOOTS?” (You might be wondering, “How many skiers does it take to change a light bulb?”)

Gary Wassmer, the rental shop supervisor happens to be standing there. He smiles as he and Howard state the obvious at the exact same time. You and your friend switched boots – you have each other’s boots on.

Lynn and Heidi lock eyes and simultaneously look down at the boots and burst our laughing.

Howard, the voice of reason, says with a huge smile on his face, “How did this girl (pointing to the long skis) fit into this girl’s (pointing to the shorter skis) boots?” Scratching our heads, we wondered how we could have possibly missed this when, (tiny feet) Lynn’s boots went on so easy and (tall) Heidi had a lot of trouble with hers and both could hardly walk up the stairs?

Now all the technicians and other renters are laughing with us. I get this party moving by directing my girlfriends to sit down and switch boots (while snapping photos to embarrass them). They are no longer hobbling and miraculously, their boots lock right into the bindings on their skis. We wave to our new best friends in the rental shop and hit the lift for an amazing day of run after run of Utah powder.

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End of Day 2: I have asked my friends for the tenth time, “now who put their boots on first?” Someone tells me not to bother applying for Mensa anytime soon.

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Despite our “user error,” we have a fantastic experience renting skis and skiing at Deer Valley.

Lessons learned:

Renting equipment is a great hassle-free way to enjoy a ski weekend out of town.

If the shoe fits, wear it. (Check your tag anyways to make sure it’s yours.)

If the shoe doesn’t fit, it’s probably not your shoe. (Check your tag to see whose it is.)

And laugh early and often with your girlfriends. Repeat.

For more information on ski rentals at Deer Valley resort, click here.

Check out more photos from our girls weekend ski trip.

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Deer Valley Resort Launches On-Mountain Interactive Mobile App

Deer Valley Resort has partnered with CarteScape, Inc., a San Diego-based mobile development company, to launch a customized mobile ski app that provides guests with a range of resort navigation, resort services and social media features.

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Available now on both iOS and Android platforms, the Deer Valley® app includes GPS navigation with augmented reality and an interactive map. Users can search runs, lodges, chairlifts and more from the app.

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Users are able to record the statistics of their ski runs, tracking both vertical distance and speed measurements. The beautifully designed app has social media integration, allowing users to share photos and run statistics on Facebook and Twitter. Users can also find friends on the mountain.

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An e-commerce component allows for easy purchase of lift tickets before arriving at the mountain and allows skiers to contact Ski Patrol with the touch of a button.

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“Deer Valley Resort makes guest service its top priority, which is why we are constantly looking for the best ways to provide guests with convenient and up-to-date technological offerings,” said Bob Wheaton, president and general manager of Deer Valley Resort.

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Features and enhancements will be released though upgrades throughout the season. For more information on the Deer Valley ski app, visit the resort’s website at deervalley.com/app

As Seen on the TODAY Show

Deer Valley Resort’s executive chef of Snow Park and Empire Canyon Lodges appeared on NBC’s TODAY Thursday, March 6, 2014, for its TODAY’S Kitchen segment. For the in-studio segment, Executive Chef Jodie Rogers showcased how to make a variety of creative pancakes, from carrot cake pancakes with cream cheese frosting to bacon, blueberry and fresh thyme pancakes.

Today

Deer Valley Resort Pancakes

Makes about 10 four-inch pancakes

Basic Pancakes Mix

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 ¼ cups buttermilk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1T + 1t olive oil
  • 1T + 1t sugar
  • 2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 cup water

Serve with blueberries, chocolate chips, butter, banana butter, berry compote, vanilla whipped cream, maple syrup, powdered sugar

Deer Valley’s Carrot Cake Pancakes

  • Makes about 10 four-inch pancakes
  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 ¼ cups buttermilk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1T + 1t olive oil
  • 1T + 1t sugar
  • 2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 cup water

1 cup fresh peeled carrots, Fine-Grate (lay on a baking sheet to air dry for approx. 15 minutes)
½ cup dried carrots, Fine-Grate (for garnish) To prepare the dried carrot: Spread the fine-grated carrot on parchment paper and slow roast at 300 degrees for approximately 20 to 30 minutes.

¾ cups toasted walnuts, chopped (save ½ for garnish)
2 tablespoons ground cinnamon

Directions:

Make the basic Pancake recipe

In a separate bowl, mix the dairy, egg, oil and vanilla. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir together.

Take ½ of the batter and add in the grated carrots and ½ of the toasted walnuts and cinnamon

Over medium heat, pour the pancake batter onto the pan.

Once bubbles form and burst on the top of the pancake it is time to flip. Only flip pancakes once.

After another 3-4 minutes, the pancake is cooked. Remove onto a plate and either eat, or place the plate in the oven on warm to keep the pancakes hot until you are finished cooking all of them. (Tip: these pancakes take longer to cook due to the extra moisture from the carrots)

Serve three pancakes stacked with dried carrots and walnuts sprinkled on top

Top with Deer Valley’s Cream Cheese Frosting

 Cream Cheese Frosting

Yield: 2.5 pounds

  • ½ lb butter, soft
  • 2 lb. cream cheese
  • ¼ teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 pinch of salt
  • 1 ¼ lbs powdered sugar

Tip: If butter is not smooth before adding cream cheese – there will always be lumps

Directions:

Beat Butter until very soft and smooth. Scrape sides several times so that no lumps remain. (Very important)

Add cream cheese, beat well – scrape again several times so that cream cheese and butter are very smooth but do not overbeat.

Add vanilla and salt

Add powdered sugar

Mix 1 minute on first speed

Scrape bowl well and mix on third speed for about 30 seconds

Don’t overbeat as it tends to make the frosting runny

Deer Valley Resort Bacon, Blueberry and Fresh Thyme Pancakes

Makes about 10 four-inch pancakes

Start with Deer Valley’s Basic Pancakes Mix

  • 2 cups all purpose flour
  • 2 ¼ cups buttermilk
  • 2 eggs
  • 1T + 1t olive oil
  • 1T + 1t sugar
  • 2 teaspoon baking powder
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1/8 cup water
  • Add:
  • 3-4 bacon slices
  • 8 sprigs fresh thyme
  • 1 pint blueberries
  • Whip cream mixed with lemon juiceand fresh thyme to taste

Directions:

Slice the bacon into small pieces and fry it over medium/high heat until it is the crispiness that you desire. When finished drain on a paper towel.

While the bacon is cooking, mix the flour, sugar, baking powder and salt into a bowl

In a separate bowl, mix the dairy, egg, oil and vanilla

Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and stir together

Over medium heat, pour the pancake batter onto the pan

Immediately after you pour the batter, sprinkle a hand full of bacon bits onto the pancake. You could mix the bacon directly into the batter, but I have found that you get better distribution if you sprinkle it on this way.

Once bubbles form and burst on the top of the pancake it is time to flip. Only flip pancakes once.

After minute or two, the pancake is cooked. Remove onto a plate and either eat, or place the plate in the oven on warm to keep the pancakes hot until you are finished cooking all of them.

Top with lemon thyme whip cream

Elderberry Compote Pancake Syrup

  • 3 ½  pints of berries (elderberries
  • 1 pint fresh (or frozen) strawberries- washed, trimmed and sliced
  • ¼ cup water
  • 2 tablespoons granulated sugar
  • ½ pint fresh blackberries
  • ½ pint fresh blueberries
  • ½ pint fresh raspberries
  • 1 splash of Grand Marnier
  • 1/8 teaspoon Vanilla Extract
  • Honey to taste

Directions:

Combine water and sugar in medium sauce pan.

Cook while stirring until sugar is dissolved and syrup is clear.

Add ½ berries and honey

Cook until berries are soft

Remove from heat and add Grand Marnier and Vanilla extract

Put remaining berries in another pan

Pour syrup over berries and mix lightly so as not to break up berries

Chill overnight

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Olympic Wrap Up

I have come out of my Olympic cloud and routine of staying up way too late and waking up early for two weeks. What else are you supposed to do during the Olympics? Although I even stick to this schedule during the summer Olympics, the alpine events are still my favorite to watch.

At the beginning of the games I was watching a women’s speed skating event when a German woman false-started. She got another try and did it again. Just like that she was out of the competition. I wanted to scream. I could feel the heartache she was going through. I wanted to reach through the TV and tell her it was okay. Millions of people are still proud of her, but at that moment no words can comfort you. I remember my Olympic moment where I was a favorite in my event and then in a second, it was gone. My mom came up to me and all she said was, “what a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.” Thanks mom!

We didn’t get to see any of the women’s ski jumping events. It saddens me because no matter the result, Americans want to see Americans compete. Especially if it’s history making .(It was the debut of the event in the Olympics.)

I must admit, I am relieved that the games finished and seemed to go off without a hitch. Okay well, maybe the opening ceremony’s lighting of the rings didn’t go as planned. But, if that was the worst thing that happened, these games were a success. I’ve been asked about the snow conditions and weather for some of the events. Do I think the playing field was fair? Do I think it was a tough venue to hold the skiing? Did “unknowns” get lucky? First of all, you’re not an “unknown” if you’re in the Olympics. Next I would say, everyone had the same conditions. Also, it’s an outdoor sport; fog and sun can come in and out at any race at any time. This is why as an athlete, sometimes World Cup overall titles are a bit more meaningful. Olympics are great but it’s one day and ANYTHING can happen.

With that said, did Ted Ligety and Mikaela Shiffrin get lucky? No, they are simply the best. They can deal with any condition; it’s what skiers train for. Bode, Ted, and Mikaela  are amazing. Julia Mancuso and Andrew Weibrecht had great performances. It’s an incredible feat to perform under pressure on a world stage and make it happen; congratulations to every athlete and their performances!

I always love the Olympic fever that comes with the games. I watch with anxious anticipation. The best part is watching them with my boys. You can start to see them thinking, “Can I do that some day?” or “I want to be like him/her.” I bet it is like this in most households. This is were the dreams begin.

As the Olympic anticipation was beginning with the personal stories and commercials, my most proud moment was a story about Mikaela Shiffrin. Even though I didn’t reach the highest goal that I started dreaming about as a kid, watching the Olympics and becoming an “Olympic medal winner”, I was flattered to see the acronym on Mikaela’s helmet A.B.F.T.T.B. (Always Be Faster Than The Boys). I still try to live by this and I’m happy I made a difference!

See you on the slopes!