Deer Valley Resort to Update 625 Main Signatures Store

Deer Valley Resort will be updating its Signatures store located at 625 Main on Park City’s Historic Main Street. With the store changes, the 625 Main Street location will be closed beginning April 27 through May 15, 2015. The store will reopen May 16 with Deer Valley Signatures’ full line of new spring and summer merchandise.

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“We look forward to the enhancements being made to our Main Street shop and brightening our customer’s shopping experience,” said Georgia Anderson, director of merchandising for Deer Valley Signatures. “We’ll close for just a couple weeks to complete the updates and look forward to welcoming customers back on May 16.”

Following the brief closing, customers looking to purchase unique Deer Valley gifts for friends or memorable souvenirs for themselves are invited to visit the newly updated Main Street Signatures, which will then remain open year-round or visit the resort’s other Signatures store location at Deer Valley Resort at 7620 Royal Street in Silver Lake Village, which will reopen for summer June 19, 2015. Deer Valley’s third store location located plaza level at Snow Park Lodge is closed during the summers.  In the interim, guests can call Signatures at 800-833-2002 with any questions or shop online at deervalley.com.

Deer Valley’s Signatures stores are stocked with exclusive apparel, blankets, accessories and glassware, along with exclusive Deer Valley logo merchandise. Customers will also find specialty food items straight from Deer Valley’s kitchens, like the legendary Turkey Chili mix or savory Fireside fig grain mustard. During the summer at Signatures, customers can also purchase general admission tickets in advance for any of Deer Valley’s Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater concerts and performances.

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For more information about the Deer Valley Signature stores view the resort’s website at deervalley.com. To follow resort happenings on social media, search #deervalleysummer.

Deer Valley Resort and Stein Eriksen Receive Governor’s State of Sport Awards

Deer Valley Resort and its Director of Skiing, Stein Eriksen, both received awards at the fourth annual Governor’s State of Sport Awards Dinner, hosted by the Utah Sports Commission and presented by Zions Bank.

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Honoring Utah’s sports achievements and celebrating Utah’s sports community, the Utah Sports Commission has awarded Deer Valley Resort the 2015 Partner of the Year Award. The Utah Sports Commission’s success is shared by many key partners and friends within Utah’s sports industry. The Partner of the Year Award recognizes the extraordinary efforts, resources and other support from sponsors, venues, hospitality, community, local organizing committees, events rights holders, volunteers and others in Utah’s sports industry who contribute valuable assistance in continuing to establish Utah as The State of Sport and enhance its Olympic Legacy. Past recipients include Zions Bank and the U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association.

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“Deer Valley has been a valuable partner in helping sustain Utah’s Olympic legacy,” said Jeff Robbins, president and CEO of the Utah Sports Commission. “Since hosting a large portion of the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, Deer Valley has continued to host World Cups and World Championships, inviting the world’s best freestyle athletes back year after year and showcasing this renowned venue to the world.”

04212015 State of Sport 036In its 34-year history, Deer Valley Resort has consistently ranked #1 in SKI Magazine’s reader’s poll, as well as garnered countless additional awards and recognitions, such as being named United States Best Ski Resort by the World Ski Awards. During the 2002 Olympic Winter Games, Deer Valley Resort was host to the men’s and women’s freestyle aerial, freestyle mogul and alpine slalom events and has hosted the 2003 and 2011 Freestyle World Championships. The Resort is a favorite stop on

the Freestyle World Cup circuit each year and each of these events bring significant economic impact and exposure to the state of Utah.

Olympic Gold Medalist and Deer Valley’s Director of Skiing, Stein Eriksen, received the Governor’s State of Sport Lifetime Achievement Award for his outstanding contributions to skiing and sports in Utah. The award is given to those who have made significant contributions in advancing and promoting sports that serve to enhance the quality of life for Utah citizens. Past recipients include Larry H. Miller (posthumously), Spencer F. Eccles, Billy Casper and Jack Nicklaus.

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“It is an honor to pay tribute to one of Utah’s most iconic sports figures for his contribution to the sport of skiing in Utah and across the Intermountain Ski Areas,” said Robbins. “Stein has garnered recognition the world over for his pioneering spirit in the sport of skiing and we are proud he has called Utah home since 1969.”

As the most recognized name in the ski world, Stein Eriksen has been synonymous with skiing style and elegance for more than half a century. The first alpine skier to win triple gold at a world championship, an Olympic Gold Medalist and ambassador and father of freestyle skiing, Eriksen has parlayed all that he knows and loves about the sport into an incredible career that has spanned almost six decades and changed the face of alpine skiing worldwide. The patriarch of elegant skiing, Eriksen successfully utilized his passion for skiing into a lifetime career and helped cultivate the internationally-renowned luxury hotel, which bears his name, located mid-mountain at Deer Valley Resort.

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Both awards were presented last night, Tuesday, April 21 at the Governor’s State of Sport Awards Dinner held at EnergySolutions Arena. Utah Gov. Gary R. Herbert provided welcoming remarks and presented the special awards to Deer Valley and Stein Eriksen. Acclaimed entertainer and motorsports enthusiast Jay Leno was also in attendance to help celebrate Utah’s best athletic achievements for the 2014 calendar year.

For more information about the Governor’s State of Sports Awards, please visit the State of Sport Awards website here.

Date Night at The Brass Tag

The Brass Tag at Deer Valley was our destination for date night but I didn’t pay much attention to the name. To me a brass tag was a pull on your jacket or an engraved name plate attached to the bottom of a picture frame.

Brass Tag - Nancy by logo sign If I had been paying any attention to subtleties, I’d have thought “mining!” “Park City” and “Deer Valley.”  I didn’t put those three together until I got there.

In the foyer of The Brass Tag, there is a shadow box with a series of tags. Historically, brass tags were used in mines to indicate who was in the mine and who was out of the mine, it gave a quick visual of how many miners were below. A miner would “tag in” or “brass in” by putting his tag (with his name or number) on a board and subsequently “tag out” or “brass out” when he left.

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For a miner, a brass tag could save his life. Now they are works of art for us to enjoy.

After our history lesson, we opened the drink menu, and found some names of our favorite Deer Valley ski runs (which are named after mining claims). While we associate Deer Valley with incredible skiing, world class service and family fun, it is nice to be reminded of the mining industry that originally built this community.

Jay kicked off the night with a Brass Tag take on the Manhattan – named Autumnal. The Brass Tag puts their twist on it with homemade citrus and spice bitters. I chose wine (not surprising) and the waiter suggested the Barbera after discussing my possible entre selections from the menu. The night was off to a solid start.

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Now I knew the Brass Tag had a brick oven but I didn’t realize the menu was expansive and innovative. I was thinking pizza, but to my surprise, the chef prepares everything in the brick oven with the open flame. It’s pretty amazing.

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Here is a taste of what we had (pun intended):

Appetizer

Oven Fired Chimichurri Chips (The Brass Tag’s take on nachos). Gold Creek cheddar, gruyère, bacon.

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Entrees

Jay came hungry and was extremely pleased with the Niman Ranch Bone-In Pork Chop with bourbon glazed acorn squash, and whole grain mustard sauce.

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 I loved the flavors as well as the portion size in Tandoori Rubbed Quail with bacon corn bread stuffing, kale chips, sweet potato purée, and lime coconut sauce.

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Our waiter brought me a Rosé to taste just to experience another side of Tandoori spices. It was interesting to taste the difference in flavors pairing the Rosé with this dish and the Barbera.  Both were excellent but different.

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Dessert 

For dessert we started with Sorbet fired in the brick oven- just kidding. (I wanted to see if you were paying attention.) Though this frozen delight was not roasted in the oven, it was an amazing mix of fresh berries.

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Pretzel bread pudding – Jay ordered this (and I ate most of it). As a pretzel lover, I went nuts over this dessert. It’s officially my new favorite.  Try it and let me know if it’s yours!

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We ended the evening having our coffee at the bar. It’s a map bar.  Like how Red Square Bar in Las Vegas has an ice bar, The Brass Tag’s take is a historical map of the mining claims of Deer Valley. We saw the claims we were standing on, claims we had skied on, as well as all the way to the Jordanelle Reservoir (which wasn’t a reservoir back then).

A little history, an interesting menu, a relaxed atmosphere and great food made a nice combination for an evening out.

To review menus, get directions and make reservations at The Brass Tag, click here.

Don’t forget to let me know how you liked the pretzel bread pudding in the comments or Tweet me @nancy_moneydiva

Carving Skis, Powder Skis and Skis In Between

I often look at my ski rack and wonder what I could change to make skiing even more fun and a little easier. In other words, which ski do I really need? This basic question conjured up so many parameters that just one simple answer seemed totally impossible. But I was determined to find out and what follows is the story of my search for the perfect ski.

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I began by visiting the Rossignol North American Headquarters, right here in Park City, Utah. I spent some time with Nick Castagnoli, communication and public relations officer for the brand. Deer Valley Resort works closely with Rossignol, one of the world’s leading equipment manufacturers, both at its Empire Test Center and also in all of its ski rental operations. Nick took me to the showroom where next winter’s collection was already on display. Needless to say that I was overwhelmed by the breadth of models available, but his expertise quickly brought some order to my confused mind.

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He first introduced the carving skis, Rossignol’s new Pursuit line. “These are pure carving tools,” said Nick, “Their mid-sole dimensions only range from 71 to 73 mm. These are fast edge-to-edge. You barely roll your ankle and you’re gone.” He immediately saw that this wasn’t quite my type of ski and explained that the carving and powder ski categories were bridged by a wonderful family of All-Mountain skis, called the Experience Series for men and the Temptation Series for women. “From coast-to-coast these skis represent the majority of our sales. They stand as benchmark of versatility for consumers. Not everyone skis deep powder.” added Nick.

I asked what might be the best width for me in the Experience line and Nick suggested that I try a few different versions at the Rossignol High Performance Test Center at Deer Valley Resort. I also asked what seemed to be the practical range of acceptable ski width (this is measured in millimeters under the foot at the mid-section of the ski) for the kind of skiing I was doing. Nick just smiled and said: “We’ve seen all kinds of widths in recent years, but the pendulum always swings back. Today from 85 to 110 mm seems to be where it’s at!”

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Nick skis on the Soul 7, a powder ski, the other flagship of the Rossignol line. “Skiers want a ski that’s versatile. Something that works for any occasion. The Soul 7 is an aspirational ski; Everyone wants to become a good powder skier.” He went on to explain the distinctive, longer lightweight (air) tip in that series of skis designed to minimize swing-weight and also match the rocker location. Nick explained, “weight is a big deal for us. Lightweight is the trend these days, so we are working hard at making both our skis and bindings significantly lighter, which in turn makes skiing much easier without compromising performance.”

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My meeting with Nick Castagnoli brought me one step closer to understanding what would be the perfect ski for me. But since I didn’t want to leave any stone unturned, I returned to the Rossignol High Performance Test Center, located near the Empire Canyon Lodge at Deer Valley Resort. I had paid one visit in January and needed to refresh my memory.

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I wanted to ski again on the Soul 7, Rossignol’s best-selling freeride ski (the Savory 7 is the women’s equivalent). If you’re not familiar with the term freeride, simply equate it to powder or deep snow skiing. This very distinctive yellow ski spans over backcountry, freestyle and powder skiing. Its particular “rocker” design is meant to prevent tip flapping and brings an effortless flotation. Because of this the ski literally plows its way through the most challenging snow conditions, from bottomless powder to forbidding crud and even spring snow. The ski also does a decent job on hard-pack but this is not where I would primarily use it. I particularly liked its tip that projects higher up, offering an added feature when going over unknown terrain in fresh snow or extremely deep moguls.

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Since I don’t spend much time skiing hard-pack, I didn’t look at or test the carving skis that Rossignol offers in this product category. I was looking for the everyday Deer Valley ski, that I think I found in the Experience series. I just want my skis to initiate easily when I take them in tight forested spots and yet I need them to be stable when I happen to find myself on groomed runs, which is where I often end up during the early and late portions of the season. The rest of the time my favorite playground is natural terrain, trees, crud (mostly) and powder of variable depth each time mother nature programs a snowfall!

I remember trying both the Experience 84 and 88. The 88 was the one I liked the most. I found it to be very versatile for my type of skiing and solid enough in terms of quickness and stability. It can carve when it has to and is very responsive, perhaps because of its more subtle rocker design. I also found it quite stable and easy to control when it had to plow through changing snow conditions or transition from smooth to bumpy terrain.

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That’s it; I have determined that the Experience 88 is the perfect ski for me. Doing a little homework was worth it and made me confident that I didn’t have to make much compromise as I have done so many times before. I’m satisfied that I have made the perfect choice, found the right equipment for me, and can already look forward to the next ski season! I hope this helps you choose your perfect ski too. 

Best Memories from My 2014 – 15 Ski Season

Each passing ski season brings us more memories and more experiences, but if we don’t make a conscious effort to inventory them all while they’re still vivid in our minds, they’ll quickly vanish. Here are a few snapshots of events that, for me, have made this winter another one to remember and treasure.

My best spring skiing season ever!

When the powder settled, this season might be called the “Endless Spring” as spring skiing conditions had never been so good for so long. The incredible layer of snow blown earlier in the winter made for a long lasting and consistent base that comfortably took us to Deer Valley’s closing day with still plenty of skiing to be had. In late March, I ran laps everyday under Sultan Express chairlift from 9 a.m. until noon and had the time of my life, mixing smooth cruising runs with interludes on corn snow when the sun had just begun to bake its surface. It was the best spring skiing I’ve experienced in the thirty years I’ve lived in Park City!

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Exploring Bucky’s Backyard with my grandson

My seven year-old grandson likes skiing under the condition that the experience be “super fun.” Just sliding down any hill won’t do. Which is why, when Finn goes skiing with grandpa, the outing has to be worth the effort and must include some adventurous skiing. What better place to take him than down one of the children’s features at Deer Valley called Bucky’s Backyard? It’s replete with humongous moguls, gulleys, ups-and-downs , downs-and-up. It’s relentless, it goes through the trees and the smaller the legs the swifter the action! Finn asks to do it again more times than not. 

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Impromptu Doctor visit, audience with a Judge.

When I ski Deer Valley by myself, and return home, my wife never fails to asks me if I have seen people we both know. I proceed to tell her that Deer Valley is a big mountain and that it’s very hard to recognize acquaintances with their gear on. With helmets and huge goggles these days, identifying folks on the hill has become all but impossible. This said, I had two interesting, random encounters this winter while riding Deer Valley’s chairlifts.

The first one happened as my wife and I were boarding Wasatch Express chairlift and a “single” joined us for the ride. He looked familiar to us and we must also have looked the same to him. After a long moment of silence, we realized he was our family doctor and he recognized us as two of his patients! Never before had we had seen him on the slopes in his ski outfit!

The second one also happened on Wasatch Express chairlift when I was skiing alone and was joined by a Deer Valley Mountain Host. We immediately started up a conversation and my female companion told me about a mishap she just had with her car on the way to work at the resort. As I began to empathize with her, she picked up on my French accent and recognized me as one of her neighbors from down the street. I didn’t know she was a Mountain Host, I only knew her as one of our Summit County Judges!

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Face shots with my daughter

My daughter lives and works in Washington D.C. and whenever she comes to visit she must have some power over the jet streams and what’s inside the clouds, because it never fails to snow. Of course, new snow means powder skiing! She got to sample the powder with me in December when Empire Bowl opened and was shredding again Centennial Trees with her Dad in early March when some 18” of new snow brought us a welcome refill.

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Running into… wildlife!

I must say that this winter season has been full of surprising encounters with wildlife on, and off, the Deer Valley slopes. The first encounter happened in December when I spotted a sage grouse ambling on the edge of Birdseye ski run. The sighting recurred late March from the Sultan Express chairlift. I spotted another sage grouse crossing at the bottom section of Tycoon. In both situations the birds didn’t seem to care about the skiers and the snow they were carving. Like the proverbial chicken, they were “just getting to the other side of the trail.”

In December an imprudent ermine in his white camouflage took upon himself to cross the trail in the area of Tycoon and Perseverance. I almost ran over him if it were not for a the last second wiggling of my skis!

In February, I was skiing down Centennial Trees when I startled a large snowshoe hare that sprung ahead of me. Rather I should say that the hare startled me! I tried to catch up with the furry critter but he left me in the dust or better yet, in the powder!

I will leave the biggest and the best of these encounters for last. Late March as my wife and I where returning home from skiing and riding the Crown Point chairlift, we saw a large female moose either grazing or looking for some dropped ski poles, smart-phone or gloves, under the lift towers.

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Now, time for you to write your list down and share your best snapshots of the season!

Five Things I’ve learned this season

We learn a lot each season about skiing. As the 2014-2015 winter comes to a close, here are five of my key “take-away” that I want to share with you.

5.  Always Keep Hoping

Last December I was expecting countless days of bottomless powder that mother nature seemed to have a difficult time dispensing. All season long I kept looking forward to “face shots” in spite of an indifferent weather forecast, unexciting predictions from the Farmer’s Almanac and the fatalistic attitudes of many of my friends. To further protect me against the fear of drought, I pushed back any thoughts of perfect bluebird days (we got many of these) and tried instead to focus on that pesky jet stream. In hopes it would redirect its precipitation towards Utah. Obviously, none of my wishful thinking worked too well and I hope it didn’t upset Mother Nature. Since I’m an optimist, I don’t think I did. I was just doing a steady job hoping and in the end, it worked to a large degree because I skied plenty of good snow this winter.

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4. A bird in the Hand is Worth Two in the Bush

My main season’s objective was to ski 100 days! I had never done it before in a non-professional capacity, so I was determined to achieve it. I must admit that when one lives in Park City it’s extremely hard not to become complacent in getting out to ski. For many of us, the sky is never perfectly blue and the snow never fluffy or deep enough. This year became the “no excuse” winter. No matter what the weather or the snow was said to be, I went out, did my skiing and without one single exception ended up pleasantly surprised. I was always glad I did it! Each of my ski outings always exceeded my expectations and I have surpassed my goal!

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3. Skiing is All About Terrain and Exploration

Too much snow can make us a bit lazy. Normally curvy, bumpy and otherwise varied terrain, looks like a flat surface on top of six feet of snow. Conversely, a thinner cover exposes more of the terrain. It shows every single little detail and nooks and crannies come in full view. This is what tempts me to explore and play in new terrain. In fact, a little bit less snow than usual reveals more of the terrain’s true texture. It also forces us to discover subtle passages into the trees, a stash of powder that no one even knew existed, an interesting short-cut, or a new path that even the most seasoned Deer Valley skier never suspected.

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2. Don’t Let Your First Run Define Your Ski Day

This winter I sometimes found it difficult to warm up as I began my ski day. My first few runs were more awkward, not as smooth and more tentative than my last run from the day before. I had noticed some of this in the past but it seems that it came out much more acutely this season. After a few more runs, my normal feelings returned and took over for the rest of the outing. It might be the simple reality that we all need to warm up or recover this animal instinct that makes us ski, as if we had been secretly endowed with that wonderful skill at birth.
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1. Easy Does It

Skiing is a wonderful way to have lots of fun outside. For some skiers the experience can be one of contemplation. For many it’s the thrill of gliding and the sensation of freedom that feels like almost flying. For many proficient skiers, it’s a combination of speed, strength and perfect execution. It’s fair to say that most skiers over exert and use up far too much energy when they are on the slopes. For life-long skiers like myself who no longer are as young and vivacious, skiing can still be enjoyable as a fusion of smooth and efficient execution. It behooves us to remain super-light and always fluid on the snow. This is a bit difficult to describe. It’s a blend of minimalism, lightness and very subtle gestures. In fact smooth skiing resembles piloting. Skiers drive their skis where they want them to go and let the forces of gravity do the heavy lifting. Granted, they need muscle strength but mostly to resist compression, accelerations and maintain an edge. Skiing effortlessly, just like a feather on the snow, has become my ultimate creed!

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Chicks on Sticks 2015

Okay, I’m just going to go ahead and say it—whoever came up with the phrase “No Friends on a Powder Day,” never met my friends. I don’t want to brag, but I have hands down, the best friends, because they all agree that the best way to enjoy powder is with each other. Last year, our annual Chicks on Sticks outing occurred on an epic powder day, and it’s safe to say that the powder would have been less enjoyable without each other’s company.

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As it turns out, you don’t need tons and tons of powder to have an epic day—as long as you have great company. I met up with Miriam, Stacey, Mir and Kellie in Snow Park Lodge at Deer Valley Resort. We lingered, just a bit over coffee, and then suited up. Stacey had been out most recently, and told us where the best skiing was. So, off we went to find it.

Let me say this, too. I had made sure to advertise the day as a mellow one—“Guys, remember, it’s all about lunch,” I wrote in one email. “So I don’t want to hear, ‘my knee hurts, so I can’t come,’ or ‘I can’t keep up with you!’”

Well, on the one hand, I meant every word of it. On the other hand—our definition of “mellow day,” may, in fact, contradict the term, “mellow.”

I could not wait to to try out my new boots. Mir was the first to notice: “Hey, you’re in the perfect position,” she said, as we skied down Star Gazer. “You’re skiing great.”

With my ego duly stoked, I set about ripping up the mountain.

In truth, our group skied quite companionably, and pressure-free, at our own paces. I think this is the secret to a good, social skiing day—coming down the mountain safely, comfortably, and at your own pace. The fact that I was trying to rip up the mountain, was, in fact, my own internal pressure meter pushed up to “high.” By the next day, this would prove to be a boneheaded strategy, but while I was skiing, I couldn’t have had more fun.

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The only thing better than the skiing that day was the chairlift rides. We mixed it up, and talked about everything from business to writing, kids and spouses, skiing and travel. And while some years we plan an elaborate sit-down lunch, this year, we decided that we felt like keeping it casual. We ate at the Snow Park Restaurant, where the awesome conversation continued.

Sadly, I had to cut out early to take care of a sick kiddo at home. I had planned to go home and then return to the mountain to pick up my healthy child at ski school, but my friends offered, generously, to ski until pickup time and bring him home for me. See? Told you, I have the best friends.

Lunch at Silver Lake

There are many ways to enjoy a great lunch at the Silver Lake Lodge. There are three Restaurants in this lodge; Bald Mountain Pizza, Royal Street Café and Silver Lake Restaurant. I wish I could tell you how wonderful every one of them was in great detail. For this article we’ll focus mostly on Silver Lake Restaurant.

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To make this food review more fun, I have asked five Deer Valley skiers about their lunch experience at Silver Lake Restaurant. As you read on, you’ll discover that each experience varies a lot depending on the circumstances, the company, the mood, the weather and what happened that day.

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Debbie from Florida:

The snow that began early this morning is still falling at noon and is likely to continue all day. No sitting on the deck today! The kids went straight to the Bald Mountain Pizza in search for some pizza and pasta. My husband and I picked a nice table just by the fireplace, we can use the rest. We’ve been playing all morning around Flagstaff Mountain, exploring the glades along Red Cloud chairlift and getting a few face shots! Now we just need to warm up a bit with a visit to the Soups and Stews station. I’ll go for the Turkey Chili and some fresh veggies while my husband is considering the roast sirloin, the sun-dried tomato soup, and may also pick the jumbo baked potato with fresh salsa and turkey chili toppings. Maybe dessert after if we can find room! 

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Greg from Texas:

Since today is our first day, we need to acclimate a bit and start progressively. We’re so fortunate to have such a postcard day with new snow and a deep blue sky. We decided to stop at 11:45 a.m. for an early lunch and get a table on the outdoor deck in full sun. My wife and I chose the Natural Salad Buffet. We both feel good and want to eat as much green as possible, spiced up with caper berries, olives and herbs. I know that I’ll go with some oriental veggies, while my wife is eyeing a piece of fresh bread and perhaps a small serving of penne pasta salad. I may also make a quick stop at the bakery and pick a jumbo cookie to cap off our first lunch on the mountain!

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Monika from New Jersey:

Another “bluebird” day, we’ve planned for lunch break at the Silver Lake Restaurant! We found a table right on the deck facing Bald Mountain. Five non-stop laps on Nabob and Keno ski runs have worked up my appetite. While my friends may be going for some soup and some chili, I’m headed towards the grill for a hamburger and a large serving of fries. Since I’ve been such a good trooper all morning, I feel that I deserve to take a longer lunch and may indulge in a local beer as well! My friends have pointed the bakery area out to me and I already know that it will be quasi-impossible not to stop by it. If I do, and deep inside I know I will, I’ll pick up a chocolate silk pie that I’ll share with Sarah. It may take some time before we step back into my skis again this afternoon, but we’ll make it up tomorrow!

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Frank from California:

It’s still snowing so my buddies and I have been exploring the Daly Chutes and skiing Ontario Bowl non-stop. I was a little hesitant when I dropped into Chute 10; but I guess peer pressure helped a lot! We’re all famished and the four of us decided to make a stop at The Carvery and really take care of our sudden hunger. Today’s roast is a marinated New York strip served with béarnaise that, with a slice of German chocolate cake, will go a long way in restoring my strength. Just add a draft beer each to that!

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Karrie from Missouri:

We can only ski until two and need to pack soon to catch our flight back home. Lunch will be from the Silver Lake Restaurant Deli. I enjoyed skiing Mayflower with Eddie, my instructor. I got a made-to-order deli sandwich with house roasted turkey breast, accompanied with some yummy condiments. A good cup of coffee along with a slice of fruit pie will keep my attention and give me the physical strength needed, not so much to end my ski day, but to leave this wonderful place!

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My Typical Deer Valley Day

There must be thousands ways to ski Deer Valley Resort, here is one local’s perspective. I am sharing with you my favorite way to navigate the mountain.

From my bed, I look out the window. I scrutinize the sky. If it’s not snowing I can see Bald Mountain in the distance and hear it calling me, “are you coming today?”

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This is the moment when I ask my wife if she feels like skiing. Depending on whether she will join me or not, my itinerary on the mountain may differ at bit, but we’ll get into this as the day unfolds.

Most of the time my day begins with a three and a half mile morning run around Park Meadows. I then eat a solid breakfast while still staring at Bald Mountain. I can now see the sun shinning off the top of the Sultan Express chairlift. Soon it’s time to gather all of my stuff, slip my pass around my neck, and get dressed. I drop my boots and helmet in the car. I load my skis on the rack, and am on my way to Deer Valley Resort.

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I make a quick stop at the unloading area to drop off my wife and our gear while I park my car. Since we always make a point of leaving home early, I usually find a convenient spot in parking Lot 2. I don’t even catch the skiers tram and instead jog back to the plaza to join my wife, pick up our skis and poles, and in no time we’re riding Carpenter Express chairlift.

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When my wife accompanies me, our morning always begins with Jordanelle ski run. We like to follow the sun around the resort. We ski down Little Stick ski run to Deer Hollow ski run where we catch Mountaineer Express chairlift. When we get there early in the morning we have the Jordanelle run to ourselves. We ski down this magical ribbon that sits above the reservoir below. There are not many ski runs like this one. If the crowds are light and the snow stays firm, we’ll repeat it, and sometimes we even do it three times.

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We then head to Bald Mountain and warm up on Nabob or Keno ski runs. Sometimes we stay there the entire morning. If I’m alone I go directly to the Ruins of Pompeii, Triangle Trees or Grizzly ski runs. I can stay there for hours on end.

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When I ski with my wife, we sometimes stay a little bit longer and include lunch in our ski day. Planning our skiing time with with a delectable goal in mind will inevitably bring us to the Empire Canyon Lodge. Perhaps it is because of its setting, cradled at the base of Daly and Empire Bowls. Most likely it is because we love the paninis that they serve. A valid set of reasons! While relaxing and enjoying our lunch break, I check the surroundings, ask questions, assess Daly Bowl and its surroundings, and depending on the conditions of the day, either ski there or check out Lady Morgan Express chairlift.

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When we’re done skiing on that side of the mountain, we eventually head back towards Silver Lake by way of Ontario Bowl. We love exploring new lines in the aspen glades all the way back to the Judge chairlift. I like this run best, it leads us effortlessly to the edge of the Nastar Race Course finish area and funnels us towards the Crown Point chairlift.

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I like riding this chair so I may turn around and observe the late afternoon skiers slaloming down the runs of Bald Mountain. I also like to stare at Empire Bowl, far in the distance, where moguls look like dimples on a golf ball and reflect the last sun of the day. Just a few days ago there was a moose eating bark off of a tree under that chairlift.

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From the top of Bald Eagle mountain, Kimberley ski run is always my favorite. I love to ski under the bridges on a trail that reminds me of a half pipe and transitions with downhill turns into Big Stick ski run. I appreciate Big Stick’s steep pitch and eventually slow down on my way to the resort’s base, I am thinking. “Another wonderful day at Deer Valley!”