Previewing the Mid-Mountain Marathon

The annual Mid-Mountain Marathon is coming up this Saturday, September 12. I am a casual road runner. I normally don’t run on trails and have never participated in a race over 17 miles. This said, I was curious to know more about the event that ushers in fall in Park City, Utah. I sat down with Executive Director of the Mountain Trails Foundation, Charlie Sturgis, who filled me in on all the details of this long distance mountain race at 8,000 feet.


JF: How many years has the Mid-Mountain Marathon been going on?

Charlie Sturgis: We’re getting close to about two decades.

JF: How many competitors does the event able attract?

Charlie Sturgis: We have between 350 and 360 participants. We try to cap it around 400. The reason why we limit the number of competitors is because passing on a single track can be a challenge. If we had over 400 racers the race would become too congested.

JF: Considering this, how is the start organized to give the fastest competitors a chance?

Charlie Sturgis: The start of the race is on the pavement, at the Silver Lake area of Deer Valley, which gives those who really need to be upfront a chance to get there from the get-go. All gets sorted out at the start.


JF: What level of competitors do you attract?

Charlie Sturgis: It is actually quite impressive. The men’s best times are generally just over 3 hours, something between 3:10 and 3:15 while the women’s finish right around 3:30 to 3:40. Because of the caliber of the field, the “rabbit” leading the race has to be a top notch rider.

JF: The “rabbit?”

Charlie Sturgis: Yes, we have someone on a mountain bike showing the way so the leading racers don’t have to worry about where the trail goes. You need a top-notch rider capable of staying clear of the first runner, a job not always easy to accomplish, especially in the uphill sections where the marathoners can catch up to that individual. All of the “rabbits” we have are always stunned by how fast the runners are.

JF: Where’s the finish line?

Charlie Sturgis: From 8,100 feet at Silver Lake, the course traverses Deer Valley Resort to Park City Village peaking out at 8,400 feet before descending to Canyons Village at 6,800 feet. This year’s finish will be off of the new Ambush-Holly trail at the Forum where the outdoor concerts take place, all of this adds up to the 26.2 miles course.


JF: Are competitors coming from all over or are they mostly locals?

Charlie Sturgis: Most of them are from Utah but we get a few from other places as well. Salomon is a sponsor for this race, so we encourage them to bring some of their racers. In years past, La Sportiva showed up with their racers. Even though this race is not on any special kind of circuit, competitors find it to be one of the most aesthetically pleasing to run.

JF: How difficult do competitors find this marathon compared to other venues?

Charlie Sturgis: Most first time competitors generally underrate the difficulty of the event. The Mid-Mountain trail was originally called the “8,000-foot trail” because it was built at around the 8,000 feet. The elevation variances of 400 feet often lead people to believe that it was not very hard. There are some significant ups and downs, including a 3,800 feet elevation gain. The terrain is very rugged in certain areas and athletes must be super mindful about where they land their feet.


JF: What advice would you give to first time participants?

Charlie Sturgis: For all of those lifestyle runners who want to get that competition off of their bucket list, the best advice is to take it easy. It’s okay to walk some sections, like the Iron Mountain area where the footing gets difficult. Catch a 20 minute break to make sure they have enough fuel left to complete the race.

JF: How many volunteers does the event have.

Charlie Sturgis: About 50 to 70 of them. If some of your readers are interested to help out, they can contact us through our website. We also try to seek out the help of the many nonprofits in town.

JF: What do the volunteers do?

Charlie Sturgis: Fifty of them staff the aid stations. We have at least 7 stations with 4 people at each. The race lasts most of the day. The course is actually closed for almost 8 hours to other users.

JF: Are emergency medical technicians on the course?

Charlie Sturgis: Yes, we have EMT’s throughout the course. The Park City Fire Department is represented too and we have Herb Lepley, a nurse practitioner from the Park City Clinic, on hand.

JF: What makes a high altitude trail marathon so unique?

Charlie Sturgis: I think it is the blend between its environment, its scenery and its simplicity. Not dealing with traffic and going from point-to-point makes it very special.

JF: Do you have any suggestions for the spectators?

Charlie Sturgis: The best areas to see the race are the start and the finish line. At either one of these spots you’ll generally find friends, family and spectators in large numbers. Anywhere in the middle of the course is very hard to find good viewing areas. So the start and finish areas are the places to be. Everyone is more than welcome to come and cheer on the participants.


See you on Saturday!

Another Great Tour of Utah

Even though I’m not a road cyclist, I love to watch a good road bike race. I always make a point of watching as much of the Tour de France as I can. Being from there and all.

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Park City hosts stages of a similar race, the annual Tour of Utah. I make certain that I don’t miss this race when it comes to town. Especially on the day when the race starts and ends on Park City’s Historic Main Street.

15 ToU Stage 7 Map 07-14-2015

Just like the Tour de France ends up parading the Parisian Champs-Élysées before coming to a close, the Tour of Utah does the same in Park City.


My wife and I went very early in the afternoon on Sunday, August 9, to visit the various vendors that were on the upper section of Main Street and to secure a good vantage point. We marveled at the Scott Sports tent where some bikes were lighter than air.


Upper Main Street was filled with vendors. We picked up some swag and admired artists writing encouraging slogans, designing all kind of symbols and painting American flags on the asphalt welcoming the competitors.


I’m not good at keeping tabs on who wins each stage and don’t know much about the teams engaged in the competition. This gives me more of a reason to cheer for each of the racers as they pass by the intersection of Heber Avenue and lower Main Street, just yards from the finish line!


These athletes seemed fueled by endless momentum gathered from reaching the top of the last peak (Empire Pass) and barreling down the rest of the course at 75 mph.


Large TV screens kept the spectators in touch with the race. The crowds began roaring a full minute before every single cyclist would make his entry onto Main Street after completing what is said to be the most grueling American cycling stage race.

dv-tou-gThe weather held steady, with some welcome big clouds making the temperature perfect. We promised that we would return next year, as the Tour of Utah will be back on Main Street, Park City, next August 7, 2016. Make sure to mark your calendar!


Tidal Wave: A Trail is Born!


Deer Valley Resort offers great lift-served access to its hiking and mountain bike trails. Every season has seen continued maintenance, upgrades and additions to the network of trails that crisscross its mountains.

For the first fifteen years all of the trails were built by hand during the spring and summer seasons. While the work quality was outstanding, the trail crew didn’t have the luxury of moving large obstacles around to create an ideal path; instead, they often had to adapt to the whims of the terrain by going around rocks, stumps or whatever got in their way. More recently, small machinery began to make a huge difference, but still couldn’t always achieve the vision that some trail designers already had in mind.

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About one and a half years ago, the resort felt that it was time for a more radical trail update to bring new elements that would reflect current riding trends and new mountain bike technology. Enter Gravity Logic. Deer Valley asked the Canadian based consulting company to make a general assessment of the resort’s trails, conduct a feasibility study for new ones and then deliver a master plan of what should be done in terms of upgrade and new trail creation. Last fall the overall plan was reviewed and the resort decided on a course of improvements that would help with the trail system’s most pressing needs.


The project began in May of 2015. Gravity Logic came to Deer Valley for two weeks, during which time plans were formulated for the creation of “Tidal Wave,” a brand new intermediate flow style trail. Chris Erkkila, assistant mountain biking manager recalls, “We broke ground on June 1st and we wanted to have some product to show on opening day. On June 19 we had the upper section of Tidal Wave ready for our season opening. Since that time sections have been added and we’re hoping that in early September the entire trail is completed.”


The new Tidal Wave trail was created with “riders from five to 65 years of age with varied mountain bike abilities” in mind as Chris puts it. This is not a beginner trail per se, but a “blue-flow” trail designed so that riders from new-intermediates through pro level can all enjoy it. Even though I’m slightly over the above-stated age limit, I recently rode it. I admit I was intimidated when I came face to face with the trail’s very first sweeping turn. However, the fun thing about Tidal Wave is that it’s been designed to be ridden at various speeds and still be fun. So fun in fact, that it duplicates the feeling of being on a roller coaster while riding a bike. What’s remarkable is that slow riders can co-exist on this trail with faster downhill pros.


Gravity Logic has worked on on a wide variety of mountain bike trails for many years and has learned what works and what doesn’t. For example, there are “hubs” built into their designs. These hubs allow riders to stop more frequently, relax, take a break or just let faster riders pass them before continuing their descent. Some of these “hubs” existed in the past, but from now on, they’ll be more ubiquitous. Also, the modern trail design is wider and provides more room to pass.

According to Erkkila, the public’s reaction to the completed upper section of Tidal Wave has been extremely encouraging, “We’ve looked at was being posted on social media. All of the comments have been very positive. We wanted to offer something that wouldn’t be too intimidating and yet provide thrills for everyone.” What’s coming out clearly is that Deer Valley now has a product unique to Utah, that can welcome a wide range of riding skills while addressing what the market demands. Bike technology has been a major driver for this. Chris adds: “Just in the last 10 years bikes have become significantly lighter, with better suspensions and more powerful brakes. These days, as bikes change, so do trails!”


As it promises to change the way riders appreciate Deer Valley’s mountain bike trails, Tidal Wave might be the first step in a transformation that may sweep the entire resort in the upcoming years.

The future master plan is likely to be a green flow-style trail, more adapted to beginners needs. “While Tidal Wave was laid out at an average grade of 8 percent, the future green trail would only be sloped between 5 to 6 percent,” explains Chris Erkkila, “It still would be a downhill bike trail, but it would be tamer, not as steep, offering a much easier starting level and a smoother progression for learners.”

This new development bodes well for the future of mountain biking at Deer Valley. Since summer isn’t over yet, make sure to try the open sections of Tidal Wave soon! There’s no need to wait until its completion at the end of the month to understand and appreciate the shape and thrills of this type of trail design!

Share your Tidal Wave photos with #DeerValleySummer on Twitter and Instagram.

Passion and Energy Produce Great Music


It often takes a leader filled with vision, passion and dedication to make something big happen and this is why Mountain Town Music (MTM) is shining such a bright light over the entire Park City Community. The man behind this wonderful story is Brian Richards, MTM’s Executive Director, who prefers to be called “Community Conductor of Musical Affairs.” I recently caught up with him to understand how music rocks all of us, from Deer Valley Resort to the most remote corners of Summit County.


JF: How was Mountain Town Music started?

Brian Richards: It was originally started by Randy Barton, around the 2002 Olympics, under the “Mountain Town Stages” name. At first, the organization literally built stages that fitted perfectly with their surroundings. Most of them were set on Main Street, near bars and restaurants, working as self sustaining outdoor music patios. Eventually, theses stages spread to surrounding rural communities.

JF: What caused you to get involved?

Brian Richards: I owned Orion Music Shop, a record store and was also involved with the Park City Film Series as one of the original founders and board members. I saw a great, untapped potential for Mountain Town Stages. I became interested and after a few years, and felt that I should get involved so I stepped in and took the lead.


JF: When was this?

Brian Richards: I think around 2009. When I realized how low my first paycheck was, I became motivated to grow the little nonprofit organization so it could reach out beyond Park City, deep into Summit County. Mountain Town Stages was a grassroots organization from the start. People loved it because they felt it was something that they owned. In 2011 we decided to change the name from Mountain Town Stages to Mountain Town Music. We were no longer just building stages, but focused on providing the community with live music.


JF: How much has MTM grown since then?

Brian Richards: This year we have programmed 197 community musical performances. Each one of these events is not a big concert like the ones we have every Wednesday night at Deer Valley Resort. Some of them are smaller, like the one in Peoa, or when solo performers are involved on Main Street. About 80% to 90% of our performances take place between June 10 and September 30. We’ll have a few more events scattered during the fall and the winter season at various venues.

JF: My favorite venue is the Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater at Deer Valley Resort, on Wednesdays. How is that free concert series working out for you?

Brian Richards: That venue is absolutely fantastic! The popular Wednesday night concert series was moved in 2008 from City Park to Deer Valley’s Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater. This natural amphitheater is awesome; you see everybody there. Whether you come on your own, as a couple holding hands, a family or a 70 person group, it’s Park City’s gathering place! You see people dancing, hula-hooping; it embodies everything Mountain Town Music is all about. The hill lends itself perfectly for music and creates that beautiful vibe. This beautiful setting epitomizes everything we want to accomplish. We want to program live music that is happy, fun and makes you feel like you want to dance and get personally into the act. In fact, it’s all the energy from the people around that fuels me, keeps me happy and rolling all summer.


JF: Whenever possible, I attend this show and am amazed at its growing popularity. How many people generally attend a typical Wednesday night concert at Snow Park?

Brian Richards: It can range anywhere from a crowd of 1,000 when the weather is threatening, to 4,000 when the sun is shinning. I think we had 4,500 people for the “Changing Lanes Experience” concert, earlier this summer. Crowds can be huge!

JF: Does it get to you when the audience is socializing more than listening to the music?

Brian Richards: It’s not just about the music. Some people get discouraged because there’s so much talking and distractions but at the end of the day, we’re here to put on a show for everyone. It’s the community’s local gathering, the music is the bonus. The concert is the place where people can meet and chat with their friends. This an opportunity to decompress, play with your kids and enjoy a glass of wine. I see it as a social gathering that just happens to feature some music. The music will eventually get to you, set you free, pull you in and you’ll end up dancing!

JF: What has changed in your concerts this year?

Brian Richards: This is actually the first year that we’ve tried to feature some artists that aren’t necessarily locals. For the past 15 years, it’s always been all local artists but now we’re sprinkling a few non-local bands to broaden the quality of the experience. We’ve debated a lot about this. The town has grown so much that there’s room for more musical diversity and for some extra growth by staying true to our roots.


JF: With so many free concerts, how can you sustain your organization?

Brian Richards: Again, we’re a true community organization. It takes a village to do what we do. We’re sustained by grants, like the Summit County Recreation Arts and Parks tax, the Restaurant tax, the Park City Foundation, Promontory Foundation and Rotary Club to name just a few. We’re also supported by other entities, like the Park Silly Market or the Arts Festival that pay us to promote our free concerts. We have sponsors and of course we have the public donations that support us. When I say we’re a community organization, we truly are supported by everybody, which is very cool!

JF: Are there other ski towns that come close to what you do?

Brian Richards: I have seen nothing in the Rocky Mountain region, or in the country, that does as much as we do on the scale of what we accomplish per capita. Until someone proves me wrong, we’re unique!


JF: With the end of summer rapidly approaching, do you have some advice for our readers?

Brian Richards: Go out and enjoy all of what Mountain Town Music has to offer. Beginning with the Wednesday concerts at Deer Valley Resort, go on a Thursday to Newpark and enjoy that venue, on Fridays you can go out to Peoa, UT and listen to some country music and on Saturdays stroll to the Miner’s Park and discover a solo singer-song writer.

On Sundays you can  join us at the Park Silly Market on Main Street. Mondays go to City Park to hear some world-class chamber musicians. What’s really cool with our offering is that everything is different and all of the venues are amazing, each one with something special to offer!

Glade Skiing at Deer Valley Resort

If you ever skied the X-Files or Triangle Trees, you have experienced the impressive glading work performed by Deer Valley Resort over the last two decades. For those not familiar with glade skiing, it means roaming freely through sparse trees in what used to be a denser forest. Many love glade skiing for its serenity, its fun, its challenge and for its fresh powder caches that remain shaded and sheltered for weeks.


To measure the resort’s commitment to glading, I met with Chuck English, Deer Valley’s Director of Mountain Operations. “It all began twenty years ago after we built the Northside Express chairlift; we wanted to create more powder opportunities,” recalled Chuck. At that time, the Utah State Forester came to Deer Valley to evaluate the entire mountain. After dividing it into specific sections, he shared his assessment about the forest stand that, in his view, was too tight. He called the excessive treed areas “dog hair stands”, and offered to paint the standing dead, or sick trees that needed to be pulled.


This is how glading began at Deer Valley. Not only did the prescribed cut improve the health of the forest, but Chuck and his associates immediately realized that they could easily ski through the openings they had just created. The work began with an area located skier’s right off Solid Muldoon ski run, where the stand of trees was particularly thick. The next summer saw the turn of the Sunset Glade and some of the Black Forest, off of Perseverance Bowl, that needed some serious clearing too.


In subsequent summers, as the State Forester could no longer work directly with the resort, a crew of several year-round employees who knew the mountain inside-out, who were all very good skiers and chainsaw experts, was formed to continue the glading work. Over the years, that sawyer’s team evolved. At some point, the resort’s top level ski instructors were part of it and today, it’s made of a couple of snow making supervisors and snow grooming supervisors. Deer Valley’s snow grooming manager currently heads the group.


The planning begins in the spring when Chuck English and the sawyers ski around the resort to spot where more glades can be added. A considerable amount of time is also spent taking input from Ski Patrol who probably know the mountain better than anyone else. Glading is a whole summer project. The team begins to work at the beginning of June and continues until October. The workday is 10 straight, long hours, four days a week, as work sites are generally difficult to access.


Sawyers do more than just glading, though. They’re also responsible for cutting the lift line when a new chairlift is installed, they may be called to cut or maintain ski trails, clear trees and branches fallen by windstorms and also perform maintenance on existing glades, just to keep up with new growth. The process is quite involved, demands a sound knowledge of the forest and of the skiing terrain.


Sawyers need to keep a meaningful variety of trees of all ages. Remarks English: “Once trees aren’t too tight, they tend to do very well and flourish. Glading is an opportunity to remove trees infested with parasites and protect healthy ones from contagion. Trees are one of our best mountain amenities!”


There is a conscious effort to identify different areas with the best glading potential. Each Deer Valley mountain has its prime spots; for example, Empire has the X-Files and Anchor Trees. Lady Morgan has Centennial Trees, Flagstaff has Ontario Bowl, Bald Mountain has Sunset Glade, Triangle Trees, and so on. Deer Valley’s sawyers try to keep most of their work above 8,000 feet. On steep and less accessible areas, the wood is left on the ground, cut into rounds small enough to lay flat, creating habitats for many animals. The dry fuel is removed to minimize fire hazard and, where accessible, the timber is pulled out and used for firewood in the Deer Valley lodges.


Unlike most western ski areas, Deer Valley Resort is located on private land. Glading wouldn’t be as easy to perform if the resort were on National Forest land. It would be possible, but would take significantly more time due to administrative rules and regulations. The sawyers have gotten skilled at knowing how to open things up. “Glading is as much as an art as it is a technique”, said Chuck. “A glade that is too open promotes moguls, something you want to avoid. Straight-line clearing isn’t desirable either. A ‘maze’ pattern is preferable to create a much more diverse and interesting skiing experience.”


While glade skiing generally requires more skills than open-terrain, Deer Valley wants more of its intermediate skiers to enjoy tree skiing. This is where some areas like Sunset Glade or the X-Files get a lot of its sawyers’ attention. They are on moderate grade and can be designed to be very user friendly and accessible to most skiers skills.


One great benefit of Deer Valley’s 930 acres of glade skiing is that they act as a reservoir of powder, as snow stays fresh longer in these sheltered areas. In addition, tight glades retain most of the snow on tree branches and requires twice as much snowfall to accumulate as much cover as that of open meadows.


In the fall, sawyers are asked by ski instructors and eager skiers wanting to know where the brand-new powder stashes will be found. Very little information percolates out of these early-season queries, as a shroud of mystery traditionally hang upon any new “powder lode.” Eventually, the secret gets out. As Chuck concludes, “our Mountain Hosts do a great job broadcasting these secrets, especially those assigned to the expert mountain tour.”

Solitude Mountain Resort; not so far!

Since Deer Valley Resort announced it would be acquiring Solitude Mountain Resort, I have always thought of Solitude as far away in a remote canyon. When thinking about the commute, people often think of the winter route that consists of driving down Parley’s Canyon and then accessing the resort from Big Cottonwood Canyon, which is about 43 miles away and takes just under one hour to reach from Deer Valley Resort.


Contrast this with getting there “as the crow flies,” about a 6 miles journey and you suddenly realize that there must be a better way to get to Solitude Mountain Resort. Not so long ago, State Route 224 went from asphalt to dirt road as soon as you reached Empire Pass and remained that way all the way to Big Cottonwood Canyon.

Since I never drive a sturdy 4×4, I’ve always preferred going to Solitude the long way, via Interstate 80 and the Salt Lake Valley, during an annual fall trip through Guardsman Pass to marvel at the bright foliage that treats motorists all the way to Solitude Mountain Resort.

In recent years SR 224 underwent some major improvements and is now easily passable with all passenger cars. On a beautiful June day we decided to adventure from Deer Valley to Solitude and find out for ourselves how close the resorts really are, via the scenic, mountain road.


Our journey began at the Deer Valley Grocery~Café where we had an early lunch on the patio overlooking the pond that has become the meeting place for the local Standup Paddleboarders. We didn’t go on the water, we just watched while enjoying a scrumptious lunch.


It’s a wonderful site for having a meal outside the hustle and bustle of Historic Main Street in Park City. The atmosphere is both quiet and relaxing. My wife had the Grilled Three Cheese and I had the Albacore Tuna Melt. When we were done munching our Chocolate Chip Cookie and sipping our coffee, we were on our way to Solitude Mountain Resort.

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We went up Marsac Ave., AKA the Mine Road, and drove all the way to Empire Pass. We made a quick stop at about 9,000 to snap a few pictures, catch a glance of Mt. Timpanogos and get our fill of the vistas before continuing on to Guardsman Pass.

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Guardsman’s lookout is at about 9,700 feet. We were astounded by the numbers of cars stationed up there this early in the season. We could barely find a parking spot. Sightseers, mountain bikers and hikers love to stop there and use this promontory as a trailhead of choice. From there, the vistas are impressive as they span all the way to the High Uintas, Deer Valley Resort, Heber City and plunge into Big Cottonwood Canyon.


The drive down canyon is now on a beautifully paved road, complete with markings and as smooth as can be. The views are awesome as the valley opens up and we soon come in sight of the Solitude Mountain Resort ski runs. Because of the canyon’s high elevation snow remains in many spots, even early summer.


Very soon, we reached the entrance to Solitude Mountain Resort where we conveniently parked our car. A larger parking area is also available a few hundred yards down the road. The village’s altitude is about 8,000 feet. It’s quite charming and reminiscent of the Alps, with its specific architecture and clock tower. Not counting our multiple stops, we drove the 13 miles between the two resorts in about half an hour; so much for the remoteness factor!


We stopped for an ice-cream at the Stone Haus Pizzeria and Creamery that had just opened up for the season (you’ll also find pizzas and sandwiches there). There’s also the Honeycomb Grill that is open Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays serving lunch, dinner and Sunday brunch. There are many good reasons to visit this new addition to the Deer Valley family of resorts!


From there, you have the option of driving down Big Cottonwood Canyon into the Salt Lake Valley, another scenic descent, or returning on the picturesque route over Guardsman’s Pass. This high-road is an alternative itinerary to consider when you drop or pick up someone at the airport, shop the Salt Lake stores or simply want to make your trip down to Salt Lake a lot more interesting!

We choose to return from where we came and enjoyed yet another series of very distinct viewpoints all the way back to Park City. We can’t wait to do it again!

Early July Activities in Park City

Summer is now upon us with its bounty of fun events and activities. During the long holiday weekend, you’ll be able to hike, ride, even race your mountain bike, golf and fly fish. The rest of the time, you’ll be wondering which outdoor concert to attend, considering strolling the Park Silly Sunday Market, stocking up on vital supplies at the Farmers Market or taking in a concert at Deer Valley Resort. There is so much to do in Park City this time of year. You can even take a trip to the Olympic Park and go for a bobsled ride or experience the zip line! You’ll also be given the opportunity see a show at the Egyptian Theater and test your taste buds at the Fox School of Wine, and culminate the week by watching the popular Fourth of July Parade on Main St. Park City!


If you love a concerts then Park City is the place to be this week. The first St. Regis Big Stars, Bright Nights Concert Series show of the summer featuring Toad the Wet Sprocket, Smash Mouth and Tonic kicks off on Tuesday, June 30 at 7 p.m. at the Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater at Deer Valley Resort.

You can also check out the free weekly concert presented by Mountain Town Music on Wednesday, July 1 featuring Robyn Cage at 6 p.m. If you miss that concert, make sure to catch another free performance by Rose’s Pawn Shop at Newpark Town Center on Thursday, July 2, at 6 p.m.


There’s another St. Regis Big Stars, Bright Nights Concert Friday, July 3, at 7 p.m., featuring Funky Meter, Dirty Dozen Brass Band and Lucia Micarelli.

On Saturday July 4, at 7:30 p.m. the Deer Valley Music Festival opens up with the Utah Symphony featuring Patriotic Pops with Bravo Broadway. You don’t want to miss that. 

The Independence Day Celebration, on Friday, July 4, in Park City has grown by leaps and bounds over the years to become the main public event of the summer! The festivities start early at 7 a.m. with a pancake breakfast at City Park. Then at 8 a.m. there’s the Park City Ski Team 5k Fun Run. The rest of the day is peppered with all kinds of activities like rugby games, live music, BBQs, a beer garden at the north end of City Park and of course at 11 a.m., the famous Fourth of July Parade in Park City with over 70 floats including, one from Deer Valley Resort. Get there early to pick your spot on Main Street or Park Avenue because it will fill up fast. The day will end with fireworks set to go off over at Park City Mountain Resort at dusk!


The Fourth of July events aren’t limited to Park City. In nearby Oakley, there will be the 80th Annual Oakley’s Fourth of July Celebration & Rodeo that blends a patriotic event with classic, western entertainment.

You won’t need to get up early the next day. Explore the Park Silly Sunday Market, right on Main Street on Sunday, July 5. It runs from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.! Walk over, catch a bus or ride your bike because parking spaces can be hard to find. The Park Silly Sunday Market is a family friendly open-air festival and market where you can unwind and find something for everyone; a cornucopia of vendors, artisans, kids’ activities, gourmet food, music, performers and even fresh vegetables!


If you like a great American classic theater, remember that you can see West Side Story at the Egyptian Theater from July 3 through July 24, 2015. Widely regarded as one of the best scores ever written, West Side Story takes the world’s greatest love story to the streets of New York City, right here in Park City.

If you are a wine connoisseur or want to become one, there’s the Fox School of Wine‘s Weekend Wine Series that kicks off on July 4 and continues through September 5. The class runs from 6 to 7 p.m. at the Silver Baron Lodge, near Snow Park at Deer Valley Resort and is designed to give beginner to experienced wine lovers a glimpse into little known stories and factoids that make the world of wine so interesting.

Even though we’re in full summer, there is some exciting freestyle skiing to watch every Saturday (11 a.m.) and Sunday (1 p.m.) at the Utah Olympic Park from July 5 to early September. “The Flying Ace All-Star Aerial Show,” is a must do for any summer list!


For nature lovers there is a Wetland Pond Walk on Tuesday, July 7, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. at the Swaner EcoCenter, near Kimball Junction. You can take a short wetland walk out to the frog ponds where the Utah Division of Wildlife Resources is reintroducing the Columbia Spotted Frog!

There is also a dance performance “You Are Now Here” by NOW-ID at the Kimball Art Center off Main Street, Park City, on Friday, July 10, from 7 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. This international and interdisciplinary contemporary dance performance will take place in the Kimball Art Center’s window display on Heber Avenue, it can be viewed from either inside the gallery, or via the sidewalk and street.

For those of you into serious sport, there’s the Echo Triathlon, on Saturday, July 11. This triathlon has become one of Utah’s largest events and traditionally sells out early. Combine the competition with warm July temperatures, a scenic ride in Utah’s unique Echo Canyon, a run on the Historic Rail Trail, and you have the perfect event for both seasoned athletes and beginners.

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The Park City Food and Wine Classic begins on July 8 and last through July 12. The festival offers a variety of experiences on the mountain, in restaurants, classrooms, and around town, which can increase your knowledge, and enjoyment of food and wine Park City has to offer.

What fun activities are you planning to attend this July in Park City? Let us know in the comments below or on Twitter @Deer_Valley.

This Bike Doctor Makes Housecalls

Troy Michaud started Flying Sprocket, a mobile bicycle repair service a few years ago. I have used it for the past two seasons to my utmost satisfaction. I had the pleasure of sitting down with Troy to learn more about his unique business.


JF: Troy, what brought you to Park City?

Troy Michaud: I came from the East Coast; I was working as a technician in a bike shop, then I traveled to Utah on a ski trip and decided to stay. First in Salt Lake and now in Park City; I’m still here seven years later.

JF: What got you into the bike business?

Troy Michaud: I was road bike racing, I was busy “chasing points” all over, east of the Mississippi, holding a semi professional license, and having fun with it. I was training, exploring and meeting all kinds of new people. I took it as far as I could while I was still holding a 40-hour a week job on top of it; a lot of work, but definitely well worth it!


JF: How would you describe Flying Sprocket?

Troy Michaud: It’s a mobile bicycle repair service.

JF: How did you come up with the idea?

Troy Michaud: While I still was in Salt Lake City, I was wondering what could I do for myself, be my own boss and still stay in the bike industry? I was afraid of a brick and mortar business and of the seasonal nature of a ski town, but I wanted to do something very unique. After seeing mobile dog grooming services and mobile car detailing around, I thought why not the mobile bicycle service? Here I am, four years later, with more work than I know what to do with.

JF: Which services do you offer?

Troy Michaud: Three quarters of the work I do are tune-ups. This means all gear adjustments, brake adjustments, bike cleaning, checking all the nuts and bolts. Then, if the bike needs parts, I’ve got plenty of wear-and-tear products on my van, like chains, cables, brake pads, tires and tubes. I can special items within 24 hours, just like your typical bike shop would.


JF: How far do you go to service your clients?

Troy Michaud: About seventy-five percent of my clients are located within the Park City  general area. I’ll occasionally do some work in Salt Lake and I even have a client in Bountiful.

JF: How does your service work?

Troy Michaud: First clients set up an appointment. I follow up by calling them to make sure all needs are covered. The only down-time for the customer is the time I’m working on the bike in their own driveway.

JF: Do you go on trails?

Troy Michaud: Not really. I’ve done it on occasions when I wasn’t busy elsewhere, but it’s only an exception.


JF: What are the most overlooked maintenance steps by riders?

Troy Michaud: It definitely is the wear-and-tear aspect of the bike. Brake pads, drive train including crank, chain ring and cassette. Of course, keeping a bike clean is very important.

JF: How often should people bring their bike for professional service?

Troy Michaud: It depends on riding frequency: If they ride one or two days a week, they can get away with one tune a year. If it’s four times a week, about two hours each time, it should at least be twice a season. More than that should be scheduled even more frequently. Mountain bikes will require more frequent servicing than road bikes.

JF: From your own standpoint what are the advantages of using your services?

Troy Michaud: Convenience is by far the greatest advantage. There’s hardly any downtime with your bike. All shops have great technicians; you can have a great experience with one particular person, but if you bring your bike back, it might not be the same individual working on it. With me, you know that I’m the same person, each time, working on your bike.

JF: How can people contact you?

Troy Michaud: A few different ways. There’s my website, email me at , or call or text me at 435 640 1006. If I cannot take your call, leave a message or send me a text at this same number, and I’ll get back to you that same day!

Carving Skis, Powder Skis and Skis In Between

I often look at my ski rack and wonder what I could change to make skiing even more fun and a little easier. In other words, which ski do I really need? This basic question conjured up so many parameters that just one simple answer seemed totally impossible. But I was determined to find out and what follows is the story of my search for the perfect ski.


I began by visiting the Rossignol North American Headquarters, right here in Park City, Utah. I spent some time with Nick Castagnoli, communication and public relations officer for the brand. Deer Valley Resort works closely with Rossignol, one of the world’s leading equipment manufacturers, both at its Empire Test Center and also in all of its ski rental operations. Nick took me to the showroom where next winter’s collection was already on display. Needless to say that I was overwhelmed by the breadth of models available, but his expertise quickly brought some order to my confused mind.


He first introduced the carving skis, Rossignol’s new Pursuit line. “These are pure carving tools,” said Nick, “Their mid-sole dimensions only range from 71 to 73 mm. These are fast edge-to-edge. You barely roll your ankle and you’re gone.” He immediately saw that this wasn’t quite my type of ski and explained that the carving and powder ski categories were bridged by a wonderful family of All-Mountain skis, called the Experience Series for men and the Temptation Series for women. “From coast-to-coast these skis represent the majority of our sales. They stand as benchmark of versatility for consumers. Not everyone skis deep powder.” added Nick.

I asked what might be the best width for me in the Experience line and Nick suggested that I try a few different versions at the Rossignol High Performance Test Center at Deer Valley Resort. I also asked what seemed to be the practical range of acceptable ski width (this is measured in millimeters under the foot at the mid-section of the ski) for the kind of skiing I was doing. Nick just smiled and said: “We’ve seen all kinds of widths in recent years, but the pendulum always swings back. Today from 85 to 110 mm seems to be where it’s at!”


Nick skis on the Soul 7, a powder ski, the other flagship of the Rossignol line. “Skiers want a ski that’s versatile. Something that works for any occasion. The Soul 7 is an aspirational ski; Everyone wants to become a good powder skier.” He went on to explain the distinctive, longer lightweight (air) tip in that series of skis designed to minimize swing-weight and also match the rocker location. Nick explained, “weight is a big deal for us. Lightweight is the trend these days, so we are working hard at making both our skis and bindings significantly lighter, which in turn makes skiing much easier without compromising performance.”


My meeting with Nick Castagnoli brought me one step closer to understanding what would be the perfect ski for me. But since I didn’t want to leave any stone unturned, I returned to the Rossignol High Performance Test Center, located near the Empire Canyon Lodge at Deer Valley Resort. I had paid one visit in January and needed to refresh my memory.


I wanted to ski again on the Soul 7, Rossignol’s best-selling freeride ski (the Savory 7 is the women’s equivalent). If you’re not familiar with the term freeride, simply equate it to powder or deep snow skiing. This very distinctive yellow ski spans over backcountry, freestyle and powder skiing. Its particular “rocker” design is meant to prevent tip flapping and brings an effortless flotation. Because of this the ski literally plows its way through the most challenging snow conditions, from bottomless powder to forbidding crud and even spring snow. The ski also does a decent job on hard-pack but this is not where I would primarily use it. I particularly liked its tip that projects higher up, offering an added feature when going over unknown terrain in fresh snow or extremely deep moguls.


Since I don’t spend much time skiing hard-pack, I didn’t look at or test the carving skis that Rossignol offers in this product category. I was looking for the everyday Deer Valley ski, that I think I found in the Experience series. I just want my skis to initiate easily when I take them in tight forested spots and yet I need them to be stable when I happen to find myself on groomed runs, which is where I often end up during the early and late portions of the season. The rest of the time my favorite playground is natural terrain, trees, crud (mostly) and powder of variable depth each time mother nature programs a snowfall!

I remember trying both the Experience 84 and 88. The 88 was the one I liked the most. I found it to be very versatile for my type of skiing and solid enough in terms of quickness and stability. It can carve when it has to and is very responsive, perhaps because of its more subtle rocker design. I also found it quite stable and easy to control when it had to plow through changing snow conditions or transition from smooth to bumpy terrain.


That’s it; I have determined that the Experience 88 is the perfect ski for me. Doing a little homework was worth it and made me confident that I didn’t have to make much compromise as I have done so many times before. I’m satisfied that I have made the perfect choice, found the right equipment for me, and can already look forward to the next ski season! I hope this helps you choose your perfect ski too.