#DeerValleySummer Mountain Bike Tip Series – Week 5

Low

Rounding out the “Four Ls” is remembering to ride low through corners and technical terrain. You give yourself a more stable platform when riding with your ankles, knees and elbows bent as opposed to standing tall and rigid. Think about how high off of the ground your bike already is – adding height by standing too tall can lead to tipping and general instability. Keeping your chest down low with your elbows out creates a stable, low center of mass. Remember to corner like a Porsche, not a monster truck.  LB2015.07.30.lowcropped

Doug demonstrates how the neutral position is a good starting point from which to get low.

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Here Doug gets low from turn initiation through it’s belly, keeping his center of mass closer to the ground, which allows for stable steering.

We hope you enjoy our weekly mountain bike tips. Please remember that they can help but will not eliminate risks, as mountain biking is a dynamic sport. These tips are meant to help you build skills and progress for a more enjoyable mountain biking experience.

 

 

#DeerValleySummer Mountain Bike Tip Series – Week 4

Level

The third of the “Four Ls,” “level,” refers to keeping your torso and shoulders relatively level to the ground and not letting them dip into the turn and/or inside the bike. You want to move your bike laterally under you, leaning your bike, not your body. Riders often get into trouble when they lean their bodies into a flat non bermed turn causing a loss of traction and/or balance. Remembering to stay level will help you avoid this pitfall. Of course, there are times when leaning your body can be useful, but in general there are few negatives in staying level.

LB2015.07.73 goodlevelcroppedIn the above image Doug is letting the bike move laterally under him, keeping his torso “quiet.”

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The image above is an example of tipping into and being inside of the turn. Doug is demonstrating incorrect technique in this image.

We hope you enjoy our weekly mountain bike tips. Please remember that they can help but will not eliminate risks, as mountain biking is a dynamic sport. These tips are meant to help you build skills and progress for a more enjoyable mountain biking experience.

Summer is all about trails! 

I started hiking and biking in early May this year, and to keep my excitement high through the rest of the summer, I recently chatted with Charlie Sturgis, Executive Director of the Mountain Trails Foundation. This organization is involved with everything trail related around Park City. Charlie told story of his Foundation, its current projects and its future goals.

JF: How did you get involved with outdoors sports and activities?

Charlie Sturgis: I’ve always been an outdoorsman, I grew up in Chicago but was always involved with hunting, fishing and skiing. I remember visiting Snowbird in 1974. That’s when I fell in love with the Wasatch Mountains and declared then and there: “This is really cool!” That is how I made Utah my home. I finished my college education at the University of Utah and went to work for Mountaineer Sports and then Wasatch Touring in Salt Lake City. I had a ball! I skied, rock climbed, ice climbed, mountain biked and kayaked wherever and whenever I could.

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JF: What brought you up to Park City?

Charlie Sturgis: Contrary to what many people believe, I didn’t actually start White Pine Touring. I came in when it had just begun in a teepee near the old Park West. The original owners asked me to manage the business for them and they eventually sold it to me. The timing was perfect and that’s when I added biking to winter sports, and we became a year round outdoor shop. My wife and I made Park City our home in 1985.

JF: How did you get involved with the Mountain Trail Foundation?

Charlie Sturgis: Jan Wilking and I started establishing the Mountain Trails Foundation, a non-profit organization, to promote trail development around Park City. In 1993 we hired Troy Duffin, our first executive director. Mountain Trail Foundation has been around for 22 years already! I eventually sold White Pine Touring, stayed on for a few more years, and as the Mountain Trail Foundation executive position opened up in 2009, I seized the opportunity.

JF: What was your vision at the start?

Charlie Sturgis: My vision was to make this nonprofit organization work and run more like a business that would become financially sustainable. At first this wasn’t the case, but today memberships represent 40% of our income, 20% to 25% comes from corporate sponsorship, another 20% to 25% is the product of races and events we organize, and the balance comes from special grants. This allow us to make decisions because we have money in the bank.

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JF: Did you find inspiration at other resorts?

Charlie Sturgis: Not really. From the get-go, things have really worked out well for us. Our growth has been organic, and when success came, we decided to share our best practices; IMBA (International Mountain Bicycling Association) is the “mothership” of an organization like ours, but we really stand as the good example out there. We’re in assuming a leadership position in the outdoors community and remain willing and ready to share our expertise and mentor other organizations.

JF: Who was your audience then, and what is it today?

Charlie Sturgis: Based on surveys, we seem to have as many hikers as we have mountain bikers. We support and advocate for non-motorized recreation. Our audience is everyone from grandparents to their grandkids, hardcore athletes and casual weekend recreationists.

JF: Non-motorized? Then tell me, how do electric bikes fit in the picture?

Charlie Sturgis: The dust has yet to settle on the use of e-mountain bikes. At this point, I’d like to leave you with a few thoughts: Besides some legal issues related to the way conservation easements are written, the electric assisted bike offers an opportunity to someone who wouldn’t normally be getting out, to enjoy the outdoors. It provides an option to easily leave one’s car home. These two goals can easily be accomplished. If today, someone on an e-bike is straying on a trail by mistake, the overall good outweighs the occasional incursion.

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JF: Over time, has your work evolved or is it still the same?

Charlie Sturgis: My job has become more administrative, something I’m not too crazy about, and more regional, in the sense that our influence reaches beyond Park City which is a very good thing.

JF: What are the opportunities for your Foundation in the greater Park City area?

Charlie Sturgis: We’re working on plans to connect all seven adjoining ski areas by trails, so bikers and hikers can go from town to town and use all lifts in between. I’d like to see the Great Western Trail be completed, but at the same time would like to see a more organic growth to our programs, so we don’t get carried away by doing too many things, too fast, and lose control over the users’ experience.

JF: Is the local business community supporting what you do?

Charlie Sturgis: Yes, they are supportive and they would be foolish not too!

JF: How do you see Deer Valley’s Mid Mountain extension fitting into the overall picture?

Charlie Sturgis: Anytime someone is willing to let us build a trail across their land, as it is the case with the Bald Eagle Homeowners Association, we should jump on the chance! Steve Graff, Deer Valley’s Ski Patrol/Mountain Bike Manager, wanted us to get involved with the build. Deer Valley’s Mid Mountain extension is going to provide an easier way down the mountain for the typical family, a gentler trail should make it a lot easier for mom, dad and the kids to get down in confidence. No matter what the size of trail infrastructure a resort can offer, it is important to think of easier access and egress points.

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JF: How can readers of this blog help Mountain Trail Foundation?

Charlie Sturgis: All non-profit organizations often go unnoticed and the Mountain Trail Foundation is no exception. Any contribution, no matter how small, is always meaningful and in the long run, contributes to the non-motorized cause!

 

#DeerValleySummer Mountain Bike Tip Series – Week 3

Loose

Our second “L,” “loose,” is all about letting the bike work under you. As in any athletic endeavor, it’s important to keep your body loose while biking. In allowing your arms and legs to move long and short you gain more suspension than just what’s on your bike. Having a death grip on your handle bars and riding rigid will only leave your body fatigued and you will constantly get thrown off balance. The looser you ride, the more fun you’ll have moving with the terrain, not bracing against it.

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Doug allows his body to work with the terrain, flexing and extending through the trail’s rollers.

We hope you enjoy our weekly mountain bike tips. Please remember that they can help but will not eliminate risks, as mountain biking is a dynamic sport. These tips are meant to help you build skills and progress for a more enjoyable mountain biking experience.

Mid-Mountain Trail Extension Opens at Deer Valley Resort

Deer Valley Resort is opening the Mid-Mountain Trail extension this Saturday, July 11, 2015. This project was a collaborative effort between Deer Valley Resort, The Mountain Trails Foundation and the Bald Eagle Homeowners Association.

dv-CSturgis-blog4The extension connects the Silver Lake area to the Deer Crest Trail for bikers and hikers to more easily access the Snow Park area and the trail system of Park City.

Mountain activities this summer promise to provide an even higher level of enjoyment as Deer Valley has embarked on its largest-ever summer investment to modernize and update its existing mountain biking and hiking trail network of over 70 miles.

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For more information on Deer Valley’s Mid-Mountain Trail extension, please visit the resort’s website at deervalley.com

#DeerValleySummer Mountain Bike Tip Series – Week 2

Look

“Look” is the first of what we like to call the “Four L’s.” For both inexperienced and experienced riders a common tendency is to look just ahead of your front wheel.  This does not allow you to anticipate what is coming next and makes us ride defensively. Being able to anticipate line choice and braking zones as well as the looking through corners and technical zones of the trail are the keys to a successful ride. So keep your chin up and your eyes down the trail.

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Doug demonstrates how to look beyond your front tire. His bike is turning but his eyes are already looking to the next part of the trail.

We hope you enjoy our weekly mountain bike tips. Please remember that they can help but will not eliminate risks, as mountain biking is a dynamic sport. These tips are meant to help you build skills and progress for a more enjoyable mountain biking experience.

#DeerValleySummer Mountain Bike Tip Series – Week 1

Hi! My name is Lara and I am the Senior Communications Coordinator for Deer Valley Resorts. Each Thursday of the #DeerValleySummer I’ll be sharing a mountain bike tip from our Mountain Bike School. Today we kick it off with the “Neutral Position.”

The neutral position, also known as the “attack” position, is an effective tool used in handling the more technical aspects of mountain biking. In the neutral position you should be standing on your pedals, both feet parallel to the ground, in a loose athletic stance with elbows out and chest low. This allows for movement of the bike under your body and can be especially useful when going downhill, coming to a change in pitch or terrain, or any rough or technical section. In this position you are not pedaling, but already have momentum to propel you forward on the trail. Think of the neutral position as a foundation for being able to do more on your mountain bike – staying seated limits the possibilities.

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LB2015.07.15.dougneutral1croppedWe hope you enjoy our weekly mountain bike tips. Please remember that they can help but will not eliminate risks, as mountain biking is a dynamic sport. These tips are meant to help you build skills and progress for a more enjoyable mountain biking experience.

 

This Bike Doctor Makes Housecalls

Troy Michaud started Flying Sprocket, a mobile bicycle repair service a few years ago. I have used it for the past two seasons to my utmost satisfaction. I had the pleasure of sitting down with Troy to learn more about his unique business.

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JF: Troy, what brought you to Park City?

Troy Michaud: I came from the East Coast; I was working as a technician in a bike shop, then I traveled to Utah on a ski trip and decided to stay. First in Salt Lake and now in Park City; I’m still here seven years later.

JF: What got you into the bike business?

Troy Michaud: I was road bike racing, I was busy “chasing points” all over, east of the Mississippi, holding a semi professional license, and having fun with it. I was training, exploring and meeting all kinds of new people. I took it as far as I could while I was still holding a 40-hour a week job on top of it; a lot of work, but definitely well worth it!

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JF: How would you describe Flying Sprocket?

Troy Michaud: It’s a mobile bicycle repair service.

JF: How did you come up with the idea?

Troy Michaud: While I still was in Salt Lake City, I was wondering what could I do for myself, be my own boss and still stay in the bike industry? I was afraid of a brick and mortar business and of the seasonal nature of a ski town, but I wanted to do something very unique. After seeing mobile dog grooming services and mobile car detailing around, I thought why not the mobile bicycle service? Here I am, four years later, with more work than I know what to do with.

JF: Which services do you offer?

Troy Michaud: Three quarters of the work I do are tune-ups. This means all gear adjustments, brake adjustments, bike cleaning, checking all the nuts and bolts. Then, if the bike needs parts, I’ve got plenty of wear-and-tear products on my van, like chains, cables, brake pads, tires and tubes. I can special items within 24 hours, just like your typical bike shop would.

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JF: How far do you go to service your clients?

Troy Michaud: About seventy-five percent of my clients are located within the Park City  general area. I’ll occasionally do some work in Salt Lake and I even have a client in Bountiful.

JF: How does your service work?

Troy Michaud: First clients set up an appointment. I follow up by calling them to make sure all needs are covered. The only down-time for the customer is the time I’m working on the bike in their own driveway.

JF: Do you go on trails?

Troy Michaud: Not really. I’ve done it on occasions when I wasn’t busy elsewhere, but it’s only an exception.

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JF: What are the most overlooked maintenance steps by riders?

Troy Michaud: It definitely is the wear-and-tear aspect of the bike. Brake pads, drive train including crank, chain ring and cassette. Of course, keeping a bike clean is very important.

JF: How often should people bring their bike for professional service?

Troy Michaud: It depends on riding frequency: If they ride one or two days a week, they can get away with one tune a year. If it’s four times a week, about two hours each time, it should at least be twice a season. More than that should be scheduled even more frequently. Mountain bikes will require more frequent servicing than road bikes.

JF: From your own standpoint what are the advantages of using your services?

Troy Michaud: Convenience is by far the greatest advantage. There’s hardly any downtime with your bike. All shops have great technicians; you can have a great experience with one particular person, but if you bring your bike back, it might not be the same individual working on it. With me, you know that I’m the same person, each time, working on your bike.

JF: How can people contact you?

Troy Michaud: A few different ways. There’s my website FlyingSprocket.com, email me at troy@flyingsprocket.com , or call or text me at 435 640 1006. If I cannot take your call, leave a message or send me a text at this same number, and I’ll get back to you that same day!

Major Mountain Bike Trail Improvements, New Dining and Concerts Usher in Deer Valley Resort’s 2015 Summer Season

As the mountains turn from white to green, Deer Valley Resort reopens its doors and lifts to guests looking to experience summer play available day and night on its mountains. From the rush of a mountain bike descent through the trees or an exhilarating hike along a ridge top to lunch served al fresco and open air evening concerts, Deer Valley offers an unparalleled alpine escape. New this season, guests can relish in summer season longer, as Deer Valley has extended its summer operations to include weekends after Labor Day through Sunday, September 20, 2015, conditions permitting.

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Summer 2015 mountainside activities promise to provide an even higher level of enjoyment as Deer Valley Resort embarks on its largest-ever summer investment to modernize and update its existing mountain biking/hiking trail inventory. Deer Valley Resort enlisted world-renowned bike resort development company, Gravity Logic, to conduct a feasibility analysis of the current mountain bike/hike trail system and provide improvement recommendations. Select recommendations provided by Gravity Logic will occur throughout the 2015 summer season, beginning in June and finishing in mid-August.

“Gravity Logic is known for having designed and built some of the planet’s most well-known, most-ridden and time-tested trails,” said Steve Graff, mountain bike manager for Deer Valley Resort. “We are excited to work with one of the most prominent designers in the world to create an even greater resort trail system that has more mass appeal for novice to expert bikers.”

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One of the scheduled improvements includes a two- to three-mile downhill mountain bike intermediate “flow” trail. This trail will be machine excavated and in-sloped with berms, rollers and jumps. To date, the majority of Deer Valley’s trails have been hand-built. The trail will be approximately four feet wide, as opposed to Deer Valley’s mostly single track trails, and will lead from the top of Bald Mountain to Silver Lake.

“Deer Valley Resort has an expansive network of mountain biking and hiking trails and the resort is already a favorite summertime destination for mountain bikers and hikers said Rob Cocquyt, owner/director of Gravity Logic. “Our goal is to work closely with Deer Valley’s in-house team to enhance what is already in place to elevate the experience for riders/hikers of all ages, skills and interests.”

In addition to trail work with Gravity Logic, Deer Valley and Mountain Trails Foundation have partnered to create an extension of the Mid-mountain trail. The trail will lead from Silver Lake to the Deer Crest trail, eliminating the climb from Silver Lake to the top of Bald Eagle and circumnavigating Bald Eagle.

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“For outdoor, nature, relaxation and music enthusiasts, Deer Valley Resort truly has it all,” said Bob Wheaton, president and general manager of Deer Valley Resort. “Summers at the resort offer guests the unique opportunity to try new outdoor activities, challenge themselves physically, discover an appreciation for nature, create lasting family memories and rejuvenate the senses—all experienced in generally mild, pleasant temperatures.”

Summer operations at the resort run seven days a week from June 19 through Labor Day, September 7, 2015, then weekends only through September 20, 2015, weather and conditions permitting. Lift-served mountain biking/hiking and scenic rides are offered from the Silver Lake Express chairlift at Snow Park, the mid-mountain Sterling Express chairlift and the Ruby Express chairlift at Empire Canyon. Summer chairlifts operate from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. (conditions permitting) and ample parking is available at Snow Park Lodge. The resort website provides detailed information on mountain biking and hiking/scenic ride lift ticket rates, as well as information on bike rentals, clinics and tours.

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For evening play, Deer Valley Resort brings in an exciting lineup of celebrated singers/songwriters/musicians to entertain guests at open-air, mountainside concerts. To compliment any evening concert, Deer Valley features Gourmet Picnic Baskets or Bags filled with delicious epicurean items from Deer Valley’s kitchens, with options for children’s single bags, gluten-free, vegan and vegetarian meals.

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The summer calendar of events features a complete line-up of outdoor concerts at the Snow Park Outdoor Amphitheater and mountain bike races. Beyond the resort, the Park City surrounding area provides a wide variety of activities, such as golf, river tubing and rafting, boating, horseback riding, ATV adventures, shopping, dining, theaters and historical museums and tours.

With Deer Valley Resort Lodging and Reservations serving not only as property manager but also as the booking agency, guests have access to the largest selection of accommodations with the best service and availability, in the Deer Valley area. Deer Valley’s expert Vacation Planners are available to help guests book and plan outings and adventures tailored to their individual needs.

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When the fun and excitement of summertime activities leave the body famished, Deer Valley now offers four delicious options for refueling. For Deer Valley guests and visitors looking to grab a quick bite or more, the new Silver Lake Snack Shack will now be open daily during the summer season. Located in the Silver Lake Ski Corral at mid-mountain, the shack offers wrap sandwiches, picnic snacks, beverages, beer, desserts and ice cream sandwiches. The shack is open daily from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., June 19 through September 7, 2015, then September 12, 13, 19 and 20, 2015.

Royal Street Café offers a casual atmosphere with scenic deck dining and creative American and international cuisine the entire family can enjoy. Royal Street Café serves creative appetizers, salads and specialties such as a fresh Dungeness crab tower with avocado and sauces of wasabi, ginger-soy and sweet chili, tuna tartare with wild arugula, truffle oil and lemon salad and of course, the famed maple bacon, barbeque bison burger. You’ll also find an equally exciting children’s menu, fine wines, beer and refreshing cocktails. Open for lunch daily June 19, through Labor Day, September 7, 2015, 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.  Royal Street Café is located mid-mountain at Silver Lake Lodge adjacent to Deer Valley’s Silver Lake Express chairlift.

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Enjoy the view and mountain air while dining lakeside on the outdoor deck at Deer Valley Grocery~Café serving fresh roasted coffee and espresso drinks, salads made with local seasonal ingredients, panini sandwiches, creative appetizer and entrée specials, freshly baked breads, desserts, cakes and other items. A selection of gourmet grocery items, house prepared take-away entrées as well as wine, beer, liquor and seasonal cocktails are available for purchase. Deer Valley Grocery~Café, located in the Deer Valley Plaza building in the Snow Park area, is open daily 7:30 a.m. to 7 p.m. (With extended evening hours until 8:30 p.m. June 19, through Labor Day, September 7, 2015.)  Please call 435-615-2400 for to-go orders.

The Brass Tag restaurant, located in the Lodges at Deer Valley, is open daily from 4 to 9 p.m. and serves their full dinner menu from 5:30 to 9 p.m. The menu features Deer Valley-inspired brick oven cuisine including fresh seafood skillets, seared meats, oven roasted fresh fish, locally sourced produce, seasonal flatbreads and specialty sides. A full bar, beer and wine are also available.

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For Deer Valley’s younger guests, ranging in age from 2 months to 12 years, the resort’s Summer Adventure Camp offers creative activities that ensure campers have fun while learning and connecting with nature. Based out of the Children’s Center at Snow Park Lodge and running Monday through Friday June 8 through August 19, 2015 (no camp on July 3 or 24), Summer Adventure Camp features hiking, hillside playgrounds, indoor entertainment and performances, a bouldering rock-climbing wall and a full supply of craft projects, games, puzzles and more.

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Deer Valley’s convenient location, just 36 miles from Salt Lake City International Airport, affords guests more time to enjoy their alpine retreat. Guests leaving either coast in the morning can be settled at the resort by early afternoon, ready for outdoor play or comfortable relaxation.

For more information on Deer Valley’s summer mountain biking, hiking, scenic chairlift rides, outdoor concerts and dining operations, please visit the resort website.

Scott Sports Announces the start of a multi-year partnership with Deer Valley Resort

Scott Sports and Deer Valley announced today an Official year-round Partnership in which Deer Valley is now the home resort for the multi-season brand.  Starting this 2014/2015 season Scott Sports will be the official goggle, pole, helmet and bike sponsor of Deer Valley Resort.

Photo courtesy of Scott Sports

Photo courtesy of Scott Sports

“We couldn’t be happier about this newly formed partnership. Since our recent relocation we have been eager to grow its presence within the local Utah community. Deer Valley has an outstanding reputation for delivering a world-class experience to its year round visitor’s, making it a seamless fit to our message as a multi-season brand,” said Scott Sports Executive Vice President John Quinn.

Under this agreement, Scott Sports will be the equipment supplier for Deer Valley employees for winter products and Scott bikes will make up Deer Valley’s entire rental fleet for their summer lift access trails.

Photo courtesy of Scott Sports

Photo courtesy of Scott Sports

“Scott is the perfect company to be represented here at Deer Valley. Their history in the skiing industry as well as the bike industry makes them well known across many adventure sports. The expertise, technology and design that they put into each of their products will be well represented here at Deer Valley,” said Bob

Since 1958 Scott Sports has pushed the limits of innovation, technology and design. From the first aluminum ski pole, to the introduction of aero bars and the original plastic motocross boot, we have led the way in the sports industry. Combining endless determination to improve with the methodical intricacy put into each product, Scott prepares athletes to reach their highest potential. Learn more at www.scott-sports.com